Human Rights and Public Health in the AIDS Pandemic

Hardcover | May 1, 1997

byLawrence O. Gostin, Zita Lazzarini, `

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A penetrating analysis of the close relationship between public health and human rights, this book makes a compelling case for synergy between the two fields. Using the AIDS pandemic as a lens, the authors demonstrate that health is closely related to human dignity and individual rights--humanrights cannot be deemed adequate and comprehensive without ensuring the health of individuals. In the course of their analysis, Gostin and Lazzarini tackle some of the most vexing issues of our time, including the universality of human rights and the counter-claims of cultural relativity. Taking acue from environmental impact assessment, they propose a human rights impact assessment for examining health policies--a tool that will be invaluable for evaluating real-world public health problems. This volume examines issues--HIV testing, screening, partner notification, isolation, quarantine, and criminalization of persons with HIV/AIDS--within the framework of international human rights law. The authors evaluate the public health implications of a wide range of AIDS policies in developedas well as developing countries. The role of women in society receives special emphasis. Finally, the book presents three case histories significant in the HIV/AIDS pandemic and analyzes them from a human rights perspective. The cases include discrimination and the transmission of HIV andtuberculosis in an occupational health care setting; breast feeding in the least developed countries; and confidentiality and the right of sexual partners to know of potential exposure to HIV. Gostin and Lazzarini have written a book that will be a valuable addition to the libraries of public healthpractitioners, legal scholars, bioethicists, policy makers, and public rights activists.

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From Our Editors

Historically, the fields of public health and human rights have remained largely separate. The AIDS pandemic, however, made it clear that a complex relationship exists between the two fields.

From the Publisher

A penetrating analysis of the close relationship between public health and human rights, this book makes a compelling case for synergy between the two fields. Using the AIDS pandemic as a lens, the authors demonstrate that health is closely related to human dignity and individual rights--humanrights cannot be deemed adequate and compre...

From the Jacket

Historically, the fields of public health and human rights have remained largely separate. The AIDS pandemic, however, made it clear that a complex relationship exists between the two fields.

Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D. (Hon.), is Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, Adjunct Professor of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, and Co-Director of the Georgetown-Johns Hopkins Program on Law and Public Health. Zita Lazzarini, J.D., M.P.H., is a public health lawyer and Lecturer on AIDS, law, and h...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:232 pages, 9.49 × 6.38 × 0.83 inPublished:May 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195114426

ISBN - 13:9780195114423

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Table of Contents

Foreword. Jose Ayala Lasso, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and Peter Piot, Executive Director, UNAIDS: 1. International Human Rights Law in the AIDS Pandemic2. Harmonizing Human Rights and Public Health3. Human Rights Impact Assessment4. AIDS Policies and Practices: Integrating Public Health Benefits and Human Rights5. Case Studies Raising Critical Questions in HIV Policy and Research: Balancing Public Health Benefits and Human Rights Burdens

From Our Editors

Historically, the fields of public health and human rights have remained largely separate. The AIDS pandemic, however, made it clear that a complex relationship exists between the two fields.

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Noted in The Lancet