Human Rights Violation In Turkey: Rethinking Sociological Perspectives by D. Straw

Human Rights Violation In Turkey: Rethinking Sociological Perspectives

byD. Straw

Hardcover | March 18, 2013

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Sociological theory has veered between an insistence on understanding human rights as a genuine universal morality and far more cynical portrayals of human rights as a veil of bourgeois capitalist enterprise. This book criticizes, adapts and combines seemingly disparate elements of contemporary sociological theory within a new approach to human rights. The practicality of the approach is clearly demonstrated in its application to one of the most important, complex and vexing locations of human rights violation in the world: modern Turkey. While sociological analyses of Turkey have largely been limited to local perspectives on individual issues of human rights violation, this book expands sociological understanding of the broad swath of Turkey's human rights violations into a new global perspective of hope and resolution.

About The Author

David Straw is currently a Visiting Fellow of the Institute for Development Policy and Management at the University of Manchester, UK.
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Title:Human Rights Violation In Turkey: Rethinking Sociological PerspectivesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.03 inPublished:March 18, 2013Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230355412

ISBN - 13:9780230355415

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Table of Contents

1. The Sociological Portrayal in Context
2. The Emergence of Human Rights
3. A Theory of Human Rights
4. Transition to 'Equality'
5. Responsibility
6. Resolution
7. Preservation

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