Hybrid Factory: The Japanese Production System in The United States by Tetsuo AboHybrid Factory: The Japanese Production System in The United States by Tetsuo Abo

Hybrid Factory: The Japanese Production System in The United States

EditorTetsuo Abo

Hardcover | May 1, 1991

Pricing and Purchase Info

$254.35

Earn 1272 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

As Japanese automotive and electronics firms have expanded their operations into the United States more attention has been focused on Japanese management and manufacturing. In Hybrid Factory a team of Japanese and American scholars explores the potential for the effective transfer of Japanesemanagement and production systems that have been credited with giving Japanese firms their competitive superiority to a much different national culture. The book looks in particular at which management factors, that provide strength to Japanese production systems, can survive the transfer to theUnited States or whether the radically different social and cultural environment makes such a transfer impossible. Contributors: Tetsuo Abo, University of Tokyo Hiroshi Itagaki, Saitama University Duane Kujawa, University of Miami Kunio Kamiyama, Josai University Hiroshi Kumon, Hosei University Tetsuji Kawamura, Teikyo University Mira Wilkins, Florida International University
Tetsuo Abo is Professor of Economics at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Tokyo and Head of the Japanese Multinational Enterprise Study Group.
Loading
Title:Hybrid Factory: The Japanese Production System in The United StatesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 9.49 × 6.38 × 1.18 inPublished:May 1, 1991Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195079744

ISBN - 13:9780195079746

Reviews

Table of Contents

Foreword: Globalization and ProductionContributors1. Tetsuo Abo: The Analysis of Japanese Factories Located Overseas2. Tetsuji Kawamura: Characteristics of the Japanese Production System and Its International Transfer Model3. Kunio Kamiyama: The Typical Japanese Overseas Factory4. Duane Kujawa and Hiroshi Kumon: Questionnaire and Survey5. Hiroshi Itagaki: Correlation Analysis Between Structural Elements of the Hybrid Model6. Hiroshi Kumon, et al.: Industrial Analysis by Industry Types7. Hiroshi Kumon, et al.: Types of Japanese Factories Located Overseas8. Tetsuo Abo: Overall Evaluation and ProspectsMira Wilkins: Epilogue: More than One Hundred Years: A Historical Overview of Japanese Direct Investment in the United StatesNotesBibliographyIndex

From Our Editors

As Japanese automotive and electronics firms have expanded their operations into the United States, more attention has been focused on Japanese management and manufacturing. In Hybrid Factory a team of Japanese and American scholars explores the potential for the effective transfer of Japanese management and production systems that have been credited with giving Japanese firms their competitive superiority in a much different national culture. The study on which Hybrid Factory is based focused on Japanese manufacturing firms that, beginning in the 1970s, and increasingly in the 1980s, vigorously embarked on overseas production in the United States. The book looks in particular at which management factors that provide strength to Japanese production systems can survive the transfer to the United States, or whether the radically different social and cultural environment makes such a transfer impossible. Hybrid Factory takes a different approach from previous books which only examined Japan's "lean production systems" unrelated to the Japanese socio-cultural backgrou

Editorial Reviews

"This book is a vital addition to our understanding of the transfer of the Japanese production system by Japanese firms operating in North America. The authors have conducted detailed interviews and provide insight into which features have been transferred and which have not beentransferred."--Martin Kenney, University of California, Davis