Hypereides: The Forensic Speeches by David Whitehead

Hypereides: The Forensic Speeches

byDavid WhiteheadEditorHypereides

Hardcover | August 1, 2000

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The Athenian lawyer-politician Hypereides (390/89-322 BC) - a central figure in Athenian political life, patriot, bon viveur, contemporary of Demosthenes, and one of the canonical Ten Attic Orators - was credited in antiquity with more than seventy speeches. All were lost until the second halfof the nineteenth century, when papyrus finds in Egypt recovered (in whole or part) six, five of them forensic. David Whitehead has for the first time provided a complete commentary on all five of the surviving forensic speeches. This book includes a general introduction, a new and accuratetranslation, and lavish historical and literary commentary.

About The Author

David Whitehead is one of the general editors of the Clarendon Ancient History Series
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Title:Hypereides: The Forensic SpeechesFormat:HardcoverPublished:August 1, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198152183

ISBN - 13:9780198152187

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`David Whitehead's new commentary on what survives of H's forensic speeches lives up to the promise of the dust-jacket of 'lavish historical and literary commentary'. Legal and political questions attract particular attention, and W's scholarly and thoroughly up-to-date commentary is destinedto become a standard work of reference, as well as putting H once and for all on the scholarly map.'Richard Hunter, The Anglo-Hellenic Review