I Yam a Donkey! by Cece BellI Yam a Donkey! by Cece Bell

I Yam a Donkey!

byCece Bell

Hardcover | June 16, 2015

Pricing and Purchase Info

$19.69 online 
$23.99 list price save 17%
Earn 98 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Even frustrated grammarians will giggle at the who's-on-first routine that begins with a donkey's excited announcement, "I yam a donkey!" Unfortunately the donkey's audience happens to be a yam, and one who is particular about sloppy pronunciation and poor grammar. An escalating series of misunderstandings leaves the yam furious and the clueless donkey bewildered by the yam's growing (and amusing) frustration. The yam finally gets his point across, but regrettably, he's made the situation a little bit too clear . . . and the story ends with a dark and outrageously funny twist.
Cece Bell is the author-illustrator of several books for children, including El Deafo, an autobiographical graphic novel. She is also the illustrator of Crankee Doodle, written by her husband, Tom Angleberger. She lives in Virginia. Visit her website at www.cecebell.com .
Loading
Title:I Yam a Donkey!Format:HardcoverDimensions:32 pages, 9.5 × 8.5 × 0.36 inPublished:June 16, 2015Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0544087208

ISBN - 13:9780544087200

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from funny confusion This is a funny story written and illustrated by Cece Bell. It's full of bad grammar, and confusion caused by bad grammar. Donkey says, "I yam a donkey." Yam tries to correct donkey's grammar, which serves to confuse donkey, frustrate yam, and lead the reader through hilarity - to a funny surprise ending.
Date published: 2017-03-07

Editorial Reviews

* The wordplay is kid-pleasingly silly with a tiny whiff of sophistication? children will never hear "eat your vegetables" the same way again" - Horn Book Magazine, starred review * "In a linguistic landscape where literally can mean figuratively and flammable and inflammable are interchangeable, Bell's story celebrates the idea that language changes, and pedants who can't adapt will be left in the dust (or in a donkey's belly)." - Publishers Weekly, starred review "This irreverent, animated outing fairly begs to be read aloud, and children will demand repeat readings." -Booklist "A hilarious battle of wits between cleverly anthropomorphized cartoon figures? Grab a teaching partner or fellow librarian for a crowd-pleasing dual read." -Bulletin "