Ibsen's Drama: Right Action And Tragic Joy by Theoharis C. Theoharis

Ibsen's Drama: Right Action And Tragic Joy

byTheoharis C. Theoharis

Hardcover | May 12, 1999

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Ibsen’s Drama: Right Action and Tragic Joy argues that in his late plays, Ibsen struggled with and finally repudiated the Aristotelian ideas of reality and change that held sway over the earlier part of his career, and more generally over nineteenth century drama and culture. The first chapter analyzes Aristotle’s Poetics, which centers on the classical relation of catharsis, rational agency, and intelligible change in human affairs. The second chapter presents Nietzsche’s transformation of those topics into a modernist poetics and a modernist agenda for living. The rest of the book analyzes Ghosts, Rosmersholm, and The Master Builder and relates Ibsen’s formal, intellectual, and cultural innovations in these plays to Nietzsche’s assault on the Aristotelian humanism that Victorian Europe valued so highly.

About The Author

Theoharis C. Theoharis teaches at Harvard University and is Editor of The Boston Book Review.

Details & Specs

Title:Ibsen's Drama: Right Action And Tragic JoyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:May 12, 1999Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan US

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0312221495

ISBN - 13:9780312221492

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Table of Contents

Action in Aristotle * Reality and Change * Poetics * Action in Nietzsche * Reality and Change * Nietzschean Poetics * Ghosts: The Sick Will * Rosmersholm: Managing the Past * The Master Builder: Act One * Act Two * Act Three

Editorial Reviews

“This is the best book on Ibsen I have read in years.” —Brian Johnston, Comparative Drama

“. . . a bright new addition to the major critical works on Ibsen . . .” —Essays in Theatre