Imperial Contagions: Medicine, Hygiene, and Cultures of Planning in Asia by Robert PeckhamImperial Contagions: Medicine, Hygiene, and Cultures of Planning in Asia by Robert Peckham

Imperial Contagions: Medicine, Hygiene, and Cultures of Planning in Asia

EditorRobert Peckham

Paperback | April 2, 2013

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Imperial Contagions argues that there was no straightforward shift from older, enclavist models of colonial medicine to a newer emphasis on prevention and treatment of disease among indigenous populations as well as European residents. It shows that colonial medicine was not at all homogeneous "on the ground" but was riven with tensions and contradictions. Indigenous elites contested and appropriated Western medical knowledge and practices for their own purposes. Colonial policies contained contradictory and cross-cutting impulses. This book challenges assumptions that colonial regimes were uniformly able to regulate indigenous bodies and that colonial medicine served as a "tool of empire."

Robert Peckham is codirector of the Centre for the Humanities and Medicine and an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong. David M. Pomfret is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong.
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Title:Imperial Contagions: Medicine, Hygiene, and Cultures of Planning in AsiaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pagesPublished:April 2, 2013Publisher:Hong Kong University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9888139525

ISBN - 13:9789888139521

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Editorial Reviews

This collection of essays edited by two history professors of the University of Hong Kong is an important addition to the growing literature on colonial medicine and public health in Asia. The book is interdisciplinary, with contributions from historians, geographers, and architects working mostly on British colonial cities in different parts of Asia (Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore, Delhi) and French Indochina in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It sheds new light on the spatial management of colonial Asian cities, a set of arrangements designed to tackle epidemiological threats that simultaneously articulated deeply seated social, racial, and political conflicts and anxieties.