In Contempt of Congress: Postwar Press Coverage on Capitol Hill by Mark J. RozellIn Contempt of Congress: Postwar Press Coverage on Capitol Hill by Mark J. Rozell

In Contempt of Congress: Postwar Press Coverage on Capitol Hill

byMark J. Rozell

Hardcover | July 1, 1996

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Over the past decade, the public's opinion of Congress has declined--election after election--to record lows. Mark J. Rozell examines the electorate's ongoing disgust with its legislature and the reasons for it. Putting recent Congresses in historical perspective, he notes that our modern representatives are actually less corrupt than those of the past, due in large measure to increased public scrutiny and ongoing tightening of ethics and conflict of interest rules. Still, the public remains skeptical, indeed hostile, toward that most representative of our national institutions. Rozell finds that much of the blame goes to highly negative press coverage of the Congress, and government in general, and that while Congress has always been a favorite target of critics and comedians, healthy skepticism has now largely been replaced by a debilitating cynicism that undermines the foundations of representative government. A major study which will be of interest to scholars and students of American politics, government, and media.

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Title:In Contempt of Congress: Postwar Press Coverage on Capitol HillFormat:HardcoverDimensions:160 pages, 9.6 × 6.41 × 0.74 inPublished:July 1, 1996Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275956903

ISBN - 13:9780275956905

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Over the past decade, the public's opinion of Congress has declined - election after election - to record lows. Mark J. Rozell examines the reasons for the electorate's ongoing disgust with its legislature. Putting recent Congresses in historical perspectives, he notes that our modern representatives are actually less corrupt than those of the past, due in large measure to increased public scrutiny and ongoing tightening of ethics and conflict of interest rules. Still, the public remains skeptical, indeed hostile, toward this most representative national institution. Rozell finds that much of the blame goes to highly negative press coverage of the Congress, and government in general, and that while Congress has always been a favorite target of critics and comedians, healthy skepticism has now largely been replaced by a debilitating cynicism that undermines the foundations of representative government. This is a major study which will be of interest to scholars and students of American politics, government, and media.

Editorial Reviews

.,."Rozell's essential argument is that, although most members of Congress are ethical and conscientious, the institution is currently held in low esteem by the public primarily because press coverage has become increasingly negative and cynical.... A worthwile endeavor with insightful observations--e.g., that because of journalists' "strong preference for activist, progressive government...coverage is most favorable in those rare occasions of policy activism and leadership during crises.""-Choice