In Odd We Trust (graphic Novel) by Dean KoontzIn Odd We Trust (graphic Novel) by Dean Koontz

In Odd We Trust (graphic Novel)

byDean KoontzIllustratorQueenie Chan

Paperback | June 24, 2008

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about

“Meet a young man named Odd . . . who helps the dead get even."

From the infinite imagination of #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz comes the suspenseful graphic-novel debut of a natural-born hero with a supernatural twist.

Odd Thomas is a regular nineteen-year-old with an unusual gift: the ability to see the lingering spirits of the dead. To Odd, it’s not such a big deal. And most folks in sleepy Pico Mundo, California, are much more interested in the irresistible pancakes Odd whips up at the local diner. Still, communing with the dead can be useful. Because while some spirits only want a little company . . . others want justice.

When the sad specter of a very frightened boy finds its way to him, Odd vows to root out the evil suddenly infecting the sunny streets of Pico Mundo. But even with his exceptional ability–plus the local police and his pistol-packing girlfriend, Stormy, backing him–is Odd any match for a faceless stalker who’s always a step ahead . . . and determined to kill again?
Dean Koontz, the author of many #1 New York Times bestsellers, lives in Southern California with his wife, Gerda, their golden retriever, Elsa, and the enduring spirit of their goldens, Trixie and Anna.
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Title:In Odd We Trust (graphic Novel)Format:PaperbackProduct dimensions:224 pages, 7.5 × 5 × 0.7 inShipping dimensions:7.5 × 5 × 0.7 inPublished:June 24, 2008Publisher:Random House Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0345499662

ISBN - 13:9780345499660

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enjoyable Found this book rather enjoyable, pleasure to read.
Date published: 2018-04-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very entertaining This was really good the story and the Odd was super
Date published: 2011-07-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A wonderful prequel Having been waiting for this for about 5 months, ever since I saw Odd Hours was to be released, I was quite excited the other day to finally get my hands on it. At first opening it, the art struck me as a bit , well, odd...but after reading the first few panels, it works very well for this story and for the characters. It was very nice to see Odd, Stormy, Terri, Chief Porter and even Elvis as I had imagined them in my mind many times before. The story is, in comparison to the books, quite simple, as there is no in depth analysis of what Odd is thinking during the events most of the time like in the novels. This is the only flaw that I can find, but given the format this was done in, a very understandable one. It's wonderful, yet sad at the same time, seeing the interactions between Odd and all the friends in Pico Mundo that he has, as we know that he does eventually leave and Stormy does eventually part ways with Odd. However, despite this, the character interaction is wonderful, just as in the books, and you really get drawn into the story by looking instead of imagining. While it all ends too quickly, I hope that there may be manga adaptations of the novels currently out already. I would love to see this. All in all, a great title with but one flaw, if you are able to accept the fact you have to use less imagination this time around. And if you can also deal with what small amount of Elvis we are dealt :D
Date published: 2008-07-01
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Interesting Graphic Novel Although this is an interesting book, I would have liked to have known it was a graphic novel before I purchased it. Not exactly my style of reading. The excerpt you read is actually from the first Odd Thomas book.
Date published: 2008-06-17

Read from the Book

THE ODD FACE IN THE MIRRORDean KoontzDuring my career, I have written a townful of characters, maybe enough of them to populate Pico Mundo, California, in which Odd Thomas lived his first twenty years. I have provided physical descriptions of those people, some in more detail than others. In all but one case, during the writing of the books in which those people appeared, I had vivid images of their faces in my mind.The exception was Odd Thomas. By page two, I knew Oddie more intimately than I had ever known another character after writing so few words about him. What I knew of Odd, however, was his heart, every chamber of it, all its secrets, all the hopes and dreams that he sheltered there, all his losses. I knew his goodness, his self-doubt, his capacity for friendship and for love, his extraordinary humility. I did not know what his face looked like.Because the book employed a first-person point of view, I could not describe him from the eyes of another character, and I did not want to engage in any hokum like having him look in a mirror and describe himself. Rather than stop writing and brood about his face, I let the narrative flow, certain that the details would accumulate until I could see him clearly in my mind’s eye.By the time I finished Odd Thomas, the first novel in the series, I not only knew Odd’s heart but also the singular workings of his mind, and not least of all the architecture of his soul. I knew him as well as--perhaps better than--I knew myself. I knew his body type. His physical qualities were clear: real strength without Schwarzeneggerian muscularity; masculinity without bravado; natural athleticism; the agility of a dancer; confidence in every pose and position, but never arrogance; self-effacement that expressed even in his physicality, so that he seemed unremarkable though he was in fact exceptional.After three books--and a fourth in the works--I do not know his face. The actor to whom readers most often refer is Toby McGuire, and I think Mr. McGuire--although soon too old for the part--would be terrific because he can project innocence without naiveté and can portray genuine goodness rather than the cloying kind. Yet Oddie’s face is not Toby McGuire’s. It is nothing like the face of any actor anyone has named.When we developed an avatar of Oddie for the website, we came up with one that I liked. But it’s not his face. I thought at first that the limitations of avatar design would not allow us the detail necessary to capture the real Odd Thomas.When the wonderful Queenie Chan presented her engaging sketches for the book you hold in your hands, I liked her Odd very much, and felt he worked perfectly for a manga. But this was not Odd’s face any more than Toby McGuire’s face is Odd’s.As I write this, I am at work on Odd Hours, and I have begun to understand why Oddie’s face will not materialize in my mind when I strive to envision it. The reason for this arises from Odd’s destiny and from his fundamental nature, which have become apparent to me as I work on this book. Because he is an archetypal character in a way I did not fully understand until he revealed it to me during this fourth novel, no face is right for him; every face is his face, in one sense, and in another sense, he is not to be understood whatsoever by his appearance but only by what will prove to be his fundamental nature, which is why his face eludes me.I now believe that, God willing, there will be six Odd Thomas novels. His end will prove to be there in his beginning, and his beginning in his end. When I get to the last page of the sixth book, I believe it will be apparent to me that everything in the series was to be foreseen in the first book, perhaps in the first chapter of the first book. And yet where I find this going is a great surprise to me and extremely exciting. Pulling off books five and six with the grace they require will be an epic challenge, and all I can do is follow my fry cook and hope that, when it’s over, I will feel that the whole series was as much a gift to me as was the first book.

Editorial Reviews

"Once in a very great while, an author does everything right—as Koontz has in this marvelous novel.... the story, like most great stories, runs on character—and here Koontz has created a hero whose honest, humble voice will resonate with many.... This is Koontz working at his pinnacle, providing terrific entertainment that deals seriously with some of the deepest themes of human existence: the nature of evil, the grip of fate and the power of love."—Publishers Weekly"Dean Koontz almost occupies a genre of his own. He is a master at building suspense and holding the reader spellbound."—Richmond Times-Dispatch"Dean Koontz is not just a master of our darkest dreams, but also a literary juggler."—The Times (London)"Once more Dean Koontz presents readers with a story and cast of characters guaranteed to entertain."—Tulsa WorldFrom the Hardcover edition.