In Praise Of Doubt: How to Have Convictions Without Becoming a Fanatic by Peter Berger

In Praise Of Doubt: How to Have Convictions Without Becoming a Fanatic

byPeter Berger

Paperback | September 7, 2010

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“A book of great practical wisdom by authors who have profound insight into the intellectual dynamics governing contemporary life.”
—Dallas Willard, author of Knowing Christ Today<_o3a_p>

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In In Praise of Doubt, two world-renowned social scientists, Peter L. Berger (The Homeless Mind, Questions of Faith) and Anton C. Zijderveld (The Abstract Society, On Clichés), map out how we can survive the political, moral, and religious challenges raised by the extreme poles of relativism and fundamentalism. A book that asks and answers Big Questions, In Praise of Doubt offers invaluable guidance on how to have convictions without becoming a fanatic.<_o3a_p>

About The Author

Peter L. Berger is an internationally renowned sociologist and faculty member at Boston University, where in 1985 he founded its Institute on Culture, Religion, and World Affairs. He is the author ofThe Social Construction of Reality,The Homeless Mind, andQuestions of Faith.

Details & Specs

Title:In Praise Of Doubt: How to Have Convictions Without Becoming a FanaticFormat:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.47 inPublished:September 7, 2010Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0061778176

ISBN - 13:9780061778179

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“This book addresses, both broadly and individually, how to balance dedication to strong religious and moral beliefs, while simultaneously being objective and discerning. This book grapples, in a thoughtful, entertaining way with these and other meaty philosophical questions.”