In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews And Blacks, 1915-1935 by Hasia R. DinerIn the Almost Promised Land: American Jews And Blacks, 1915-1935 by Hasia R. Diner

In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews And Blacks, 1915-1935

byHasia R. Diner

Paperback | October 1, 1995

Pricing and Purchase Info

$33.49 online 
$38.95 list price save 14%
Earn 167 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Seeking the reasons behind Jewish altruism toward African Americans, Hasia Diner shows how - in the wake of the Leo Frank trial and lynching in Atlanta - Jews came to see that their relative prosperity was no protection against the same social forces that threatened blacks. Jewish leaders and organizations genuinely believed in the cause of black civil rights, Diner suggests, but they also used that cause as a way of advancing their own interests - launching a vicarious attack on the nation that they felt had not lived up to its own ideals of freedom and equality.
Hasia Diner is professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the author of Erin's Daughters in America and A Time for Gathering: The Second Migration, 1820-1880 (Volume II in the series The Jewish People in America), both available from Johns Hopkins.
Loading
Title:In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews And Blacks, 1915-1935Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.89 inPublished:October 1, 1995Publisher:Johns Hopkins University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801850657

ISBN - 13:9780801850653

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

Seeking the reasons behind Jewish altruism toward African Americans, Hasia Diner shows how - in the wake of the Leo Frank trial and lynching in Atlanta - Jews came to see that their relative prosperity was no protection against the same social forces that threatened blacks. Jewish leaders and organizations genuinely believed in the cause of black civil rights, Diner suggests, but they also used that cause as a way of advancing their own interests - launching a vicarious attack on the nation that they felt had not lived up to its own ideals of freedom and equality.

Editorial Reviews

No one has equaled the American historian Hasia Diner in richly documenting the strong support given to African-American legal, economic, and educational rights, between 1880 and 1935, by Jewish newspapers, religious leaders, lawyers, labor leaders, social workers, and philanthropists.