Indigenous Religions: A Companion

Paperback | January 1, 2000

EditorGraham Harvey

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Indigenous religions are the majority of the world's religions. This Companion shows how much they can contribute to a richer understanding of human identity, action, and relationships.An international team of contributors discuss representative indigenous religions from all continents. The book is in three parts--Persons, Powers, and Gifts.Relevant to everyone interested in human religiosity today.

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Indigenous religions are the majority of the world's religions. This Companion shows how much they can contribute to a richer understanding of human identity, action, and relationships.An international team of contributors discuss representative indigenous religions from all continents. The book is in three parts--Persons, Powers, and ...

Graham Harvey is Reader in Religious Studies at the Open University, UK.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9.16 × 6.05 × 0.9 inPublished:January 1, 2000Publisher:BloomsburyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0304704482

ISBN - 13:9780304704484

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"Wide-ranging...The editor, best known for his work on contemporary paganism, provides an innovative introduction, framing the essays that follow theoretically and challenging the readers' presuppositions. The essays are relatively accessible to the non-specialist and would make a useful introductory text for an undergraduate course on religions not often covered in standard 'world religions' textbooks." --Religious Studies Review