Indus Waters and Social Change: The Evolution and Transition of Agrarian Society in Pakistan

Hardcover | November 15, 2012

bySaiyid Ali Naqvi

not yet rated|write a review
Saiyid Ali Naqvi has brought a wealth of knowledge in water resources development, acquired over a 58-year career, to this study of the impact of the harnessing of the Indus waters on the evolution and development of the fabric of society in the region. He follows the Indus in its journey fromaround 7000 bc to present times, as he develops his thesis that the processes of social change in the region that now constitutes Pakistan are inextricably linked to the harnessing of the Indus waters. At its inception in 1947, Pakistan, with 85 percent of its population dependent on agriculture, was an agrarian country. Today, with two-thirds of its population still living in villages, the country remains dependent on agriculture. Despite the use of machinery by big landowners, the agrariansocial structure remains fettered by quasi-feudal and tribal customs. The book makes a critical assessment of the pace of the social change process in Pakistan and finds that it has reached a phase which could at best be characterized as "quasi-industrial". This disappointing situation is due to theslow pace of industrialization of the agriculture sector. The book provides the research, historical facts, and insights for an informed public debate on the policy measures for overcoming impediments and accelerating the social change process.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$120.00

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Saiyid Ali Naqvi has brought a wealth of knowledge in water resources development, acquired over a 58-year career, to this study of the impact of the harnessing of the Indus waters on the evolution and development of the fabric of society in the region. He follows the Indus in its journey fromaround 7000 bc to present times, as he deve...

Saiyid Ali Naqvi was born in 1931 in Amroha, UP, and, after obtaining a graduate degree in civil engineering from Aligarh Muslim University, moved to Pakistan, where he commenced his career with the Pakistan government's Central Engineering Authority (CEA). He received field training in the United States and also attended Irrigation S...
Format:HardcoverDimensions:844 pages, 9.45 × 7.09 × 0.98 inPublished:November 15, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199063966

ISBN - 13:9780199063963

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Indus Waters and Social Change: The Evolution and Transition of Agrarian Society in Pakistan

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations (Images, Maps, and Diagrams)List of Tables and FiguresPrefaceAcknowledgementsAbbreviationsGlossaryIntroductionPart I: Indus Region in Ancient to Early Medieval Period1. The Indus: An Introduction2. Pre-History, Indus Civilization, and Early (Vedic) Aryans3. The Historical PeriodPart II: Indus Region in Medieval Times (1206-1843)4. Harnessing the Indus Waters in Medieval Times (1206-1843)5. Economy and Society in Medieval Times (1206-1843)Part III: Indus Region in the British Colonial Times (1843-1900)6. Harnessing the Indus Waters (1843-1900)7. Economy and Society (1843-1900)Part IV: Indus Region in the British Colonial Times (1900-1947)8. Harnessing the Indus Waters (1901-1940)9. Economy and Society (1901-1940)10. The Final Years of Colonial Rule (1941-1947)Part V: Inception and Formative Years of Pakistan (1947-1961)11. The Early Years of Pakistan (1947-1950)12. Harnessing the Indus Waters (1951-1962)13. Economy and Society (1951-1962)Part VI: The Years of Accomplishments and Debacles (1961-1980)14. Harnessing the Indus Waters (1961-1980)15. Economy and Society (1961-1980)Part VII: Harnessing the Indus Waters and the State of Economy and Society in the Turbulent Era (1981-2008)16. Harnessing the Indus Waters (1981 to 2008)17. A Panorama of the Agricultural Situation (1981- 2008)18. Agriculture, Economic Growth and Industrialism during Military Rule (1981-82 to 1987-88)19. Agriculture, Economic Growth and Industrialism during the Quasi-Civilian Rule (1988-89 to 1998-99)20. Agriculture, Economic Growth and Industrialism during the Turbulent Era (1999-2008)21. Selected Key Indicators of Social Dynamics (1981-2008)EpilogueNotesBibliographyIndex