Information Technology and the Productivity Paradox: Assessing the Value of Investing in IT

Hardcover | April 9, 1999

byHenry C. Lucas

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From networks to databases, email to voicemail, the amount of capital being invested in information technology each year is staggering. By 1996, U.S. firms were spending more than $500 billion annually on software, networks and staff. The recently merged Bank of America and NationsBank havean initial IT budget of 4 billion dollars. As firms like this push rapidly into the business world of the 21st century, the question has remained: how do firms measure returns from these substantial investments in information technology? Henry C. Lucas, effectively answers this question by providing a creative and reliable framework for measuring the competitive advantages and profits gained through investments in state-of-the-art information systems. There is value in information technology, and it is possible to showreturns, Lucas argues--unfortunately this value just doesn't always show up clearly on the bottom line of a ledger. In five expertly presented sections, he spells out exactly what businesses can expect from their information technology investments--some investments create a measurable value, some donot, but all are important nonetheless. Through a precise mix of frameworks and models, such as an Investment Opportunities Matrix, and punctuated with real examples from successful firms, this is the first book to allow executives to see exactly how their information technology investment can beexpected to return value, thereby maximizing their advantages in an age of global competitiveness. Indeed, firms who manage their information systems most efficiently are best suited to succeed in a rapidly evolving marketplace. With so much at stake, Information Technology is certain to be the essential guide for firms determined to compete and flourish in the highly competitive economy ofthe next century.

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From Our Editors

As economies of the world become increasingly competitive, it’s important for firms to know about the advantages of investing in the newest information technology. Devised by author Henry C. Lucas, Jr., the framework for spending on information systems ensures the investment you make is a wise one. Networks, e-mail, voice mail and data...

From the Publisher

From networks to databases, email to voicemail, the amount of capital being invested in information technology each year is staggering. By 1996, U.S. firms were spending more than $500 billion annually on software, networks and staff. The recently merged Bank of America and NationsBank havean initial IT budget of 4 billion dollars. A...

Henry C. Lucas is Professor of Information Systems, Stern School of Business, New York University.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 6.1 × 9.21 × 1.1 inPublished:April 9, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195121597

ISBN - 13:9780195121599

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From Our Editors

As economies of the world become increasingly competitive, it’s important for firms to know about the advantages of investing in the newest information technology. Devised by author Henry C. Lucas, Jr., the framework for spending on information systems ensures the investment you make is a wise one. Networks, e-mail, voice mail and databases get a full-account in the new technology picture.

Editorial Reviews

"The question of the returns from IT investments has long been a controversial issue. Lucas provides an interesting perspective, one that endeavors to recognize the complexity at the issue. The business reader will find numerous examples of the various types of returns one can obtain fromIT. He...develops a framework that permits evaluation of new situations, a useful addition as more and more organizations find IT an integral part of competing in the 21st century."--Michael S. Scott Morton, Sloan School of Technology, MIT