Innocence Slaughtered: Gas And The Transformation Of Warfare And Society by Jean Pascal ZandersInnocence Slaughtered: Gas And The Transformation Of Warfare And Society by Jean Pascal Zanders

Innocence Slaughtered: Gas And The Transformation Of Warfare And Society

EditorJean Pascal Zanders

Paperback | November 15, 2016

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Among the many deadly innovations that were first deployed on the battlefields of World War I, none was as terrifying—or notorious—as poison gas. First used by the Germans on April 22, 1915, gas was instantly seen as a new way of fighting war, an indication that total warfare was here, and would be far more devastating and cruel than anyone had imagined.
This book investigates the effects of chlorine gas at all levels, from its effects on individual soldiers to its impact on combat operations and tactics to its eventual role in the push to codify rules of warfare. Gathering eleven historians and experts on chemical weapons, Innocence Slaughtered puts WWI's cruelest innovation into its historical, industrial, and social context.
 
Jean Pascal Zanders is an independent consultant on disarmament and security.  
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Title:Innocence Slaughtered: Gas And The Transformation Of Warfare And SocietyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9.25 × 6.75 × 0.7 inPublished:November 15, 2016Publisher:Uniform PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1910500410

ISBN - 13:9781910500415

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Table of Contents

Author Biographies
Foreword by Ambassador Ahmet Üzümcü, Director-General, OPCW
Maps
Introduction by Jean Pascal Zanders
Jean Pascal Zanders: The Road to Hague
Olivier Lepick: Towards Total War: Langemarck, 22 April 1915
Luc Vandeweyer: The Belgian Army and the Gas Attack on 22 April 1515
Dominick Dendooven: 22 April 1915 — Eyewitness Accounts of the First Gas Attack
Julian Putkowski: Toxic Shock: The British Army’s Reaction to German Poison Gas During the Second Battle of Ypres
David Omissi: The Indian Army at the Second Battle of Ypres
Bert Heyvaert: Phosphene in the Ypres Salient 19 December 1915
Gerard Oram: A War on Terror: Gas, British Morale, and Reporting the War in Wales
Wolfgang Wietzker: Gas Warfare in 1915 and the German Press
Peter van den Dungen: Civil Resistance to Chemical Warfare in the First World War
Leo van Bergen and Maartje Abbenhuis: Man-monkey, Monkey-man: Neutrality and the discussions about the ‘inhumanity’ of poison gas in the Netherlands and International Committee of the Red Cross
Jean Pascal Zanders: The Road to Geneva