Instinct;  Its Office In The Animal Kingdom, And Its Relation To The Higher Powers In Man by Paul Ansel Chadbourne

Instinct; Its Office In The Animal Kingdom, And Its Relation To The Higher Powers In Man

byPaul Ansel Chadbourne

Paperback | February 8, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1872 Excerpt: ... LECTURE II. OPERATIONS IN INORGANIC NATURE AND PLANT LIFE THAT SIMULATE INSTINCT. Definitions of Paley, Whately and Hamilton considered.--The office of the Physical Forces.--Life, Sensation, Volition.--Method of discussion explained.--Positivism.--Instinct part of a series of agencies.--Life depending upon the position of the earth and the changes within it.--Geologic changes.--Activities of the plant.--Instinct-like provisions of plants.--Community of action.--Special provision of the tree for itself.--Special structures and functions.--Provision made by plants for their young. In our last lecture we gave three definitions of Instinct from writers of acknowledged authority,--Paley, Whately and Hamilton. Definitions might be multiplied, but those are as well fitted as any, for provisional use. Let us see exactly what they affirm. Paley says there is a propensity prior to experience and independent of instruction. From this we infer, that the propensity is to do something which might by some beings be learned from experience or that might be learned by them from another, by instruction. But we are not told whether the being that acts instinctively has any power of gaining knowledge by experience or from instruction, or whether it has any comprehension of the work which it performs. In fact the definition, instead of settling any thing, is simply a dogmatic assertion from which questions branch off in all directions. And many of our best naturalists would begin by denying the assertion altogether. Whately says, Instinct is a tendency to some mode of action, and since he says it is a blind tendency--we suppose he argues that the tendency comes without experience or instruction. But he adds this important element to Paley's definition, that this tendency is ind...

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Title:Instinct; Its Office In The Animal Kingdom, And Its Relation To The Higher Powers In ManFormat:PaperbackDimensions:72 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.15 inPublished:February 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021749059X

ISBN - 13:9780217490597

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