Instrumental Traditions and Theories of Light: The Uses of Instruments in the Optical Revolution by Xiang ChenInstrumental Traditions and Theories of Light: The Uses of Instruments in the Optical Revolution by Xiang Chen

Instrumental Traditions and Theories of Light: The Uses of Instruments in the Optical Revolution

byXiang Chen

Paperback | October 10, 2012

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An analysis of the optical revolution in the context of early 19th century Britain. Far from merely involving the replacement of one optical theory by another, the revolution also involved substantial changes in instruments and the practices that surrounded them. People's judgements about classification, explanation and evaluation were affected by the way they used such optical instruments as spectroscopes, telescopes, polarisers, photometers, gratings, prisms and apertures. There were two instrumental traditions in this historical period, each of which nurtured a body of practice that exemplified how optical instruments should be operated, and especially how the eye should be used. These traditions functioned just like paradigms, shaping perspectives and even world views.
Readership:Scholars and graduate students in the history of science, history of instrument, philosophy of science and science studies. Can also be used as a textbook in graduate courses on 19th century physics.
Title:Instrumental Traditions and Theories of Light: The Uses of Instruments in the Optical RevolutionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:213 pages, 23.5 × 15.5 × 0.02 inPublished:October 10, 2012Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9401058245

ISBN - 13:9789401058247

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Table of Contents

List of Figures. Acknowledgments. Introduction. 1. Comparisons of Explanatory Power. 2. Explanatory Power and Classification. 3. Classification and the Use of Instruments. 4. The Dispute over Dispersion. 5. The Discovery of the `Polarity of Light'. 6. The Measurements of the Intensity of Light. 7. Instrumental Traditions. 8. The Geometric Tradition and the Wave Theory of Light. 9. The Visual tradition and the Closure of the Optical Revolution. Conclusion. Appendixes. Notes. References. Name Index. Subject Index.