International Human Rights Law in Africa

Paperback | May 5, 2012

byFrans Viljoen

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This book provides a comprehensive and analytical overview of human rights law in Africa. It examines the institutions, norms, and processes for human rights realization provided for under the United Nations system, the African Union, and sub-regional economic communitites in Africa, andexplores their relationship with the national legal systems of African states.Since the establishment of the African Union in 2001, there has been a proliferation of regional institutions that are relevant to human rights in Africa. These include the Pan African Parliament, the Peace and Security Council, the Economic, Social and Cultural Council and the African Peer ReviewMechanism of the New Partnership for Africa's Development. This book discusses the links between these institutions. It further examines the case law stemming from Africa' most important human rights instrument, the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights, which entered into force on 21 October1986. This new edition contains a new chapter on the African Children's Rights Committee as well as full coverage of new developments and instruments, such as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Convention on Enforced Disappearances, and the African Charter on Democracy,Elections and Governance.Three cross-cutting themes are explored throughout the book: national implementation and enforcement of international human rights law; legal and other forms of integration; and the role of human rights in the eradication of poverty. The book also provides an introduction to the relevant humanrights concepts.

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From the Publisher

This book provides a comprehensive and analytical overview of human rights law in Africa. It examines the institutions, norms, and processes for human rights realization provided for under the United Nations system, the African Union, and sub-regional economic communitites in Africa, andexplores their relationship with the national leg...

Frans Viljoen is Professor of International Human Rights Law and Director of the Centre for Human Rights at the University of Pretoria in South Africa.

other books by Frans Viljoen

Format:PaperbackDimensions:688 pages, 9.69 × 6.73 × 0.01 inPublished:May 5, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199645590

ISBN - 13:9780199645596

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Table of Contents

Part I - Background1. An Introduction to International Human Rights LawPart II - The Global Level2. The Role of United Nations Organs and Agencies in Realizing Human Rights in Africa3. The United Nations Treaty-Based Human Rights System and AfricaPart III - The Regional Level4. The African Regional Architecture and Human Rights5. Substantive Human Rights Norms in the African Regional System6. The African Commission: An Introduction and Assessment7. The African Commission: Protective Mandate8. The African Commission: Promotional Mandate9. The African Children's Rights Committee10. The African Court on Human and Peoples' RightsPart IV - The Subregional Level11. The Realization of Human Rights in Africa through Subregional InstitutionsPart V - The National Level12. Domestication of Human Rights LawPart VI - Conclusion13. Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

Review from previous edition: "This book embodies the knowledge acquired by an eminent and well-respected African scholar and activist who has worked within the African human rights system for many... it does provide the uninitiated with a very comprehensive overview of human rights in Africa.The bibliography alone is a useful and comprehensive reference point. This volume therefore is highly recommended reading for anyone who wants to get a taste of the ways in which the various institutions, both African and otherwise, have considered human rights on the continent" --Human Rights Law Review (9)