International Relations in Uncommon Places: Indigeneity, Cosmology, and the Limits of International Theory by J. BeierInternational Relations in Uncommon Places: Indigeneity, Cosmology, and the Limits of International Theory by J. Beier

International Relations in Uncommon Places: Indigeneity, Cosmology, and the Limits of International…

byJ. Beier

Paperback | December 8, 2009

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The central claim developed in this book is that disciplinary International Relations is identifiable as both an advanced colonial practice and a postcolonial subject. The book explores how IR has internalized many of the enabling narratives of colonialism in the Americas, evinced most tellingly in its failure to take notice of indigenous peoples. More fundamentally, IR is read as a knowing hegemonic Western voice that, owing to its universalist pretensions, asserts its knowledge to the exclusion of all others.
J. Marshall Beier is Assistant Professor of Political Science, McMaster University.
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Title:International Relations in Uncommon Places: Indigeneity, Cosmology, and the Limits of International…Format:PaperbackDimensions:272 pagesPublished:December 8, 2009Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:023061907X

ISBN - 13:9780230619074

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Table of Contents

Revealing the Hegemonologue * Disciplinary IR and Its Disciplined Others * Ethnography, Ethics, and Advanced Colonialism * Lakota Lifeways: Continuity and Change in a Colonial Encounter * Advanced Colonialism and Pop-Culture Treatments of Indigenous North Americans * Travelogues: The Ethnographic Foundations of Orthodox International Theory * Emancipatory Violences * Recovering International Relations from Colonial Practice

Editorial Reviews

"This engaging and analytically sophisticated text is one of the most original, insightful and transformative contributions to recent debates. Beier deftly weaves indigenous and 'undisciplinary' knowledges to expose the complicity of IR theorists - even critical theorists - in advanced colonialism. Better yet, he moves beyond critique. Advocating a more nuanced form of conversation - 'not in the interest of the Other alone' - he also demonstrates how his development of postcolonial theory, informed by an ethics of responsibility, enables more productive and emancipatory possibilities. This bold, courageous, and elegantly argued book warrants reading by all IR theorists."-- V. Spike Peterson, University of Arizona"International Relations in Uncommon Places challenges us to expand where we look for international relations, how we look for it, and the voice(s) we use to speak of it. Acutely aware of his own voice and privileged position as a western academic, Beier calls our attention to a marginalized people and a marginalized way of seeing and "knowing," that may offer an important corrective to what he refers to as the "hegemonologue" of dominant western voices."--Roxanne Lynn Doty, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Arizona State University