Intimate Commerce: Exchange, Gender, and Subjectivity in Greek Tragedy

Paperback | January 1, 1997

byVictoria Wohl

not yet rated|write a review

Exchanges of women between men occur regularly in Greek tragedy—and almost always with catastrophic results. Instead of cementing bonds between men, such exchanges rend them. They allow women, who should be silent objects, to become monstrous subjects, while men often end up as lifeless corpses. But why do the tragedies always represent the transferal of women as disastrous?

Victoria Wohl offers an illuminating analysis of the exchange of women in Sophocles' Trachiniae, Aeschylus' Agamemnon, and Euripides' Alcestis. She shows how the attempts of women in these plays to become active subjects rather than passive objects of exchange inevitably fail. While these failures seem to validate male hegemony, the women's actions, however futile, blur the distinction between male subject and female object, calling into question the very nature of the tragic self. What the tragedies thus present, Wohl asserts, is not only an affirmation of Athens' reigning ideologies (including its gender hierarchy) but also the possibility of resistance to them and the imagination of alternatives.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$49.50

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From Our Editors

Author Victoria Wohl offers an illuminating analysis of the exchange of women in Sophocles's TRACHINIAE, Aeschylus's AGAMEMNON, and Euripides's ALCESTIS. Wohl shows the failure of women to become active subjects. While these failures seem to validate male hegemony, the women's actions blur the distinction between male subject and femal...

From the Publisher

Exchanges of women between men occur regularly in Greek tragedy—and almost always with catastrophic results. Instead of cementing bonds between men, such exchanges rend them. They allow women, who should be silent objects, to become monstrous subjects, while men often end up as lifeless corpses. But why do the tragedies always represen...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:332 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.88 inPublished:January 1, 1997Publisher:University Of Texas Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292791143

ISBN - 13:9780292791145

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Intimate Commerce: Exchange, Gender, and Subjectivity in Greek Tragedy

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsIntroduction. Exchange, Gender, and SubjectivityThe Tragic ExchangeReaffirmation, Resistance, NegotiationThe Social Economy of ExchangeThe Subject of ExchangePart One. Sovereign Father and Female Subject in Sophocles’ TrachiniaeOne. “The Noblest Law”: The Paternal Symbolic and Its Reluctant SubjectThe Final ExchangeHeracles: Subject under SiegeHyllus: The Reluctant EphebeTwo. The Foreclosed Female SubjectIole, Deianira, and the Triangle of ExchangeAnti d r n d ta: Deianira’s Gift-GivingStatus and GenderA Woman’s kleosThree. Alterity and IntersubjectivityInterpellation of the Other, Creation of the SelfSpatial Models of Self and Other: Pandora and kalokagathiaThe Virgin in the GardenPart Two. The Violence of kharis In Aeschylus’s AgamemnonFour. The Commodity Fetish and the Agalmatization of the Virgin DaughterMarx and the Fetishized EconomyThe Occluded ExchangeThe Agalmatization of the Virgin DaughterFive. Agalma ploutou: Accounting for HelenThe Disenchantment of the agalmaKhrusamoibos s mat n: The Commodification of the Male SubjectSix. Fear and Pity: Clytemnestra and CassandraAndroboulon kear: Clytemnestra’s Transgressive IdentityA Lament for the FatherPart Three. Mourning and Matricide in Euripides’ AlcestisSeven. The Shadow of the Object: Loss, Mourning, and ReparationEight. Agonistic Identity and the Superlative SubjectThe Matriarch of the oikos and Alcestis’s Domestic PoliticsThe Superlative Subject and Her HusbandFrom Tragedy to the SymposiumNine. The Mirror of xenia and the Paternal SymbolicFrom Impossible kharis to the agalma EconomyFrom physis to praxisHeracles and the Mirror of xeniaThe Final ExchangeConclusion. Too Intimate CommerceNotesBibliographyGeneral IndexIndex Locorum

From Our Editors

Author Victoria Wohl offers an illuminating analysis of the exchange of women in Sophocles's TRACHINIAE, Aeschylus's AGAMEMNON, and Euripides's ALCESTIS. Wohl shows the failure of women to become active subjects. While these failures seem to validate male hegemony, the women's actions blur the distinction between male subject and female object, calling into question the very nature of the tragic self