Introduction To Critical Phenomena In Fluids

Hardcover | June 15, 2005

byEldred H. Chimowitz

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Introduction to Critical Phenomena in Fluids encompasses the fundamentals of this relatively young field, as well as applications in the fields of chemical engineering, analytical chemistry, and environmental remediation processing. The exercises in the text have been developed in a way thatmakes the book suitable for graduate courses in chemical engineering thermodynamics and physical chemistry.

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Introduction to Critical Phenomena in Fluids encompasses the fundamentals of this relatively young field, as well as applications in the fields of chemical engineering, analytical chemistry, and environmental remediation processing. The exercises in the text have been developed in a way thatmakes the book suitable for graduate courses...

Eldred H. Chimowitz is at University of Rochester.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:380 pages, 6.3 × 9.29 × 0.91 inPublished:June 15, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195119304

ISBN - 13:9780195119305

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Table of Contents

1. Fundamentals of Thermodynamic Stability1.1. Mathematical and Thermodynamic Preliminaries1.2. Thermodynamic Stability Theory1.3. Thermodynamic Conditions at the Limit of Stability1.4. Equivalence of Stability Criteria between Different Thermodynamic Potentials1.5. Further Use of Combined Theorems1.6. Chapter Review1.7. Additional Exercises2. The Critical Point in Pure Fluids and Mixtures2.1. The Critical Point: Pure Fluids2.2. Generalization of the Results to Multicomponent Mixtures2.3. Beyond the Limit of Stability2.4. Chapter Review3. Thermodynamic Scaling Near the Critical Point3.1. The Classical Equation of State, Path Dependence, and Scaling at the Critical Point3.2. The Various Critical Exponents and their Scaling Paths3.3. Scaling in Terms of Kt, Cp, and ~p3.4. The Griffiths-Wheeler Classification3.5. The Direction of Approach to the Critical Point3.6. Scaling Results from the Stable Limit of Stability Conditions3.7. Chapter Review3.8. Additional Exercises4. Scaling Near the Critical Point Mixtures4.1. The Critical-Line Topography in Binary Supercritical Mixtures