Introduction To Student-involved Assessment For Learning, An With Myeducationlab With Enhanced…

Book & Toy | August 22, 2016

byJan Chappuis, Rick Stiggins

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0133436519 / 9780133436518 Introduction to Student-Involved Assessment FOR Learning, An with MyEducationLab with Enhanced Pearson eText, Loose-Leaf Version -- Access Card Package 7/e

 

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0133436519 / 9780133436518 Introduction to Student-Involved Assessment FOR Learning, An with MyEducationLab with Enhanced Pearson eText, Loose-Leaf Version -- Access Card Package 7/e   Package consists of:    0134450264 / 9780134450261 Introduction to Student-Involved Assessment FOR Learning, An, Loose-Leaf Version 0134493...

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From reviews of the text:     “The text clearly lays out assessment design for beginners. It is clear and easy to read. . . . The overall clarity of the text makes this textbook an important tool in educating pre-service teachers.” Xyanthe Neider, Washington State University     “The overall theme of this text is that assessment ...

Jan Chappuis, educator and author, joined Rick Stiggins at the Assessment Training Institute in Portland, Oregon in 2001. Prior to that she has been an elementary and secondary teacher as well as a curriculum developer in English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, and World Languages.      For the past twenty years Chappuis h...

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Format:Book & ToyDimensions:360 pages, 9.1 × 7.4 × 0.4 inPublished:August 22, 2016Publisher:Pearson EducationLanguage:English

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ISBN - 10:0133436519

ISBN - 13:9780133436518

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Table of Contents

Brief Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Classroom Assessment for Student Success 

Chapter 2 Why We Assess 

Chapter 3 What We Assess: Clear Learning Targets

Chapter 4 Designing Quality Classroom Assessments 

Chapter 5 Selected Response Assessment 

Chapter 6 Written Response Assessment 

Chapter 7 Performance Assessment 

Chapter 8 Personal Communication as Assessment 

Chapter 9 Record Keeping: It’s More Than Paperwork 

Chapter 10 Students Collecting and Reflecting on Evidence of Their Learning 

Chapter 11 Report Card Grading: Summarizing Achievement at a Point in Time 

Chapter 12 Effective Communication with Conferences 

Appendix A Assessing Dispositions 

Appendix B Understanding Standardized Tests

 

Detailed Table of Contents

Preface xv

Chapter 1 Classroom Assessment for Student Success 1   

    Chapter 1 Learning Targets 1

    The Teacher’s Classroom Assessment Responsibilities 2

        Gathering Accurate Information about Student Learning 4

        Supporting Student Learning 5

    Keys to Assessment Quality 5

        Key 1: Start with a Clear Purpose 5

        Key 2: Establish Clear and Appropriate Learning Targets 7

        Key 3: Create High-Quality Assessments That Yield Dependable Information 7

        Key 4: Communicate Results Effectively 8

    An Overarching Principle: Student Involvement 8

        A Classroom Example of Student-Involved Assessment 9

    Understanding Motivation to Learn 10

        Learning Orientation 11

        Ego-Involved Orientation 12

        Task-Completion Orientation 12

        Goal Orientations and College and Career Readiness 12

        Goal Orientations and the Connection to Assessment 14

    Summary: The Importance of Sound Assessment 15

    Suggested Activities 16

Chapter 2 Why We Assess 19

    Chapter 2 Learning Targets 19

    Formative and Summative Purposes for Assessment 20

        High-Impact Formative Assessment Practices 21

    How Formative and Summative Assessment Fits into a Balanced Assessment System 23

        Balancing Formative and Summative Assessment in the Classroom 24

        Balanced Assessment throughout the School System 25

        Annual Testing 29

    Assessment for Learning in the Classroom 30

        Where Am I Going? 32

        Where Am I Now? 32

        How Can I Close the Gap? 33

        The Seven Strategies as a Progression 34

    Summary: Assessment for Many Purposes 37

    Suggested Activities 38

Chapter 3 What We Assess: Clear Learning Targets 41

    Chapter 3 Learning Targets 41

    Defining Learning Targets 42

        Terminology 44

        Where Learning Targets Come From 45

        Content Standards Developed by National Organizations and Consortia 45

    Categories of Learning Targets 46

        Knowledge-Level Targets 48

        Reasoning-Level Targets 49

        Performance Skill Targets 56

        Product-Level Targets 56

        Disposition Targets—the Affective Domain 58

        Classifying Targets by Type 60

    Deconstructing Complex Content Standards 63

    Communicating Learning Targets to Students 67

        1. Share the Target “As Is” 68

        2. Convert the Terms in the Target to Student-Friendly Language 69

        3. Share a Student-Friendly Version of a Rubric with Students 70

        When to Share the Target and How to Check for Understanding 73

    Summary: Clear Targets Are Essential for Sound Assessment 75

    Suggested Activities 76

Chapter 4 Designing Quality Classroom Assessments 79

    Chapter 4 Learning Targets 79

    The Assessment Options 80

        Selected Response Assessment 81

        Written Response Assessment 81

        Performance Assessment 82

        Personal Communication 83

    Selecting an Appropriate Assessment Method 83

        Assessing Knowledge Targets Accurately 86

        Assessing Reasoning Targets Accurately 88

        Assessing Mastery of Performance Skills Accurately 91

        Assessing Product Targets Accurately 92

    The Assessment Development Cycle 93

        The Assessment Planning Stage 95

        The Assessment Development Stage 104

        The Assessment Use and Refinement Stage 105

    Formative Assessment Ideas for Use with Assessment Blueprints 105

    Summary: A Vision of Excellence in Classroom Assessment 105

    Suggested Activities 107

Chapter 5 Selected Response Assessment 111

    Chapter 5 Learning Targets 111

    The Myth of Objectivity 112

    Considerations When Using Selected Response Assessment 113

    Creating a High-Quality Selected Response Assessment 114

        Step 1: Determining the Assessment Purpose 114

        Step 2: Specifying the Intended Learning Targets 115

        Step 3: Selecting the Appropriate Assessment Method(s) 115

        Step 4: Determining the Appropriate Sample Size 117

        Step 5: Develop or Select Items, Exercises, Tasks, and Scoring Procedures 118

        Step 6: Review and Critique the Overall Assessment before Use 133

        Steps 7 and 8: Use and Refine the Assessment 134

    Using Selected Response Assessment Formatively with Students 135

        Where Am I Going? 135

        Where Am I Now? 136

        How Can I Close the Gap? 138

    Summary: Productive Selected Response Assessment 141

    Suggested Activities 143

Chapter 6 Written Response Assessment 147

    Chapter 6 Learning Targets 147

    Considerations When Using Written Response Assessment 148

        Written Response Assessment of Knowledge-Level Learning Targets 149

        Written Response Assessment of Reasoning-Level Learning Targets 149

        Assessing Student Writing as a Product 150

        Limitations 150

    Creating a High-Quality Written Response Assessment 150

        Step 1: Determining the Assessment Purpose 151

        Step 2: Specifying the Intended Learning Targets 151

        Step 3: Selecting the Appropriate Assessment Method(s) 152

        Step 4: Determining the Appropriate Sample Size 152

        Step 5 Part I: Develop or Select the Items 153

        Step 5 Part II: Develop or Select the Scoring Guide 158

        Step 6: Review and Critique the Overall Assessment before Use 167

        Steps 7 and 8: Use and Refine the Assessment 168

    Using Written Response Assessment Formatively with Students 172

        Where Am I Going? 172

        Where Am I Now? 172

        How Can I Close the Gap? 173

    Summary: Tapping the Potential of Written Response Assessment 176

    Suggested Activities 177

Chapter 7 Performance Assessment 181

    Chapter 7 Learning Targets 181

    Considerations When Using Performance Assessment 182

        Performance Assessment of Knowledge-Level Targets 183

        Performance Assessment of Reasoning-Level Targets 183

        Performance Assessment of Performance Skill Targets 184

        Performance Assessment of Product Targets 184

        Limitations 184

    Planning a High-Quality Performance Assessment 185

        Step 1: Determining the Assessment Purpose 185

        Step 2: Specifying the Intended Learning Targets 185

        Step 3: Selecting the Appropriate Assessment Method(s) 186

        Step 4: Determining the Appropriate Sample Size 186

        Step 5 Part I: Develop or Select the Task 188

        Step 6 Part I: Review and Critique the Task before Use 196

        Step 5 Part II: Develop or Select the Scoring Rubric 196

        Step 6 Part II: Review and Critique the Rubric before Use 213

        Steps 7 and 8: Use and Refine the Assessment 217

    Using Performance Assessment Formatively with Students 218

        Where Am I Going? 218

        Where Am I Now? 219

        How Can I Close the Gap? 221

    Summary: Thoughtful Development Yields High-Quality Performance Tasks and Rubrics 223

    Suggested Activities 225

Chapter 8 Personal Communication as Assessment 229

    Chapter 8 Learning Targets 229

    Considerations When Assessing Via Personal Communication 231

        Assessing Knowledge-Level Learning Targets with Personal Communication 231

        Assessing Reasoning-Level Learning Targets with Personal Communication 231

        Assessing Performance Skill Targets with Personal Communication 232

        Assessing Product Targets with Personal Communication 232

        Understanding the Quality Control Issues 233

    Example of a More Challenging Fit 237

    The Many Forms of Personal Communication as Assessment 238

        Instructional Questions and Answers 238

        Class Discussions 245

        Conferences and Interviews 249

        Oral Examinations 249

        Journals and Logs 251

    Summary: Person-to-Person Assessment 253

    Suggested Activities 254

Chapter 9 Record Keeping: It’s More Than Paperwork 258

    Chapter 9 Learning Targets 258

    From Records to Useful Information 259

    Guideline 1: Record Formative and Summative Assessment Information Separately 260

    Guideline 2: Organize Entries in the Gradebook According to the Learning Target Represented 261

        Standards-Based Grade Reports 264

        Using Computer Programs for Grade Management 264

        Level of Detail 264

    Guideline 3: Keep Track of Work Habits and Social Skills Separately from Achievement Information 268

        Extra Credit Work 269

    Guideline 4: Record Information by Raw Score When Possible 270

    Summary: Going for the Record 270

    Suggested Activities 271

Chapter 10 Students Collecting and Reflecting on Evidence of Their Learning 274

    Chapter 10 Learning Targets 274

    Prerequisites to Successful Student Record Keeping 276

    Recording Information from Assignments and Assessments 276

    Writing in Learning Journals 278

    Collecting Evidence in a Portfolio 281

        Benefits of Portfolios 281

        Misconceptions about Portfolios 281

        Types of Portfolios 282

        Work Sample Annotations 284

        Involving Students in Selecting Portfolio Entries 285

    Periodic Student Self-Reflection 287

    Summary: Student-Involved Record Keeping and Reflection 289

    Suggested Activities 291

Chapter 11 Report Card Grading: Summarizing Achievement at a Point in Time 294

    Chapter 11 Learning Targets 294

    What Is the Purpose of Grades? 295

        Underlying Belief 1: The Purpose of Grades Is Also to

        Sort and Select 296

        Underlying Belief 2: The Purpose of Grades Is Also to Motivate 297

        The Sole Purpose of Grades Is to Communicate 297

    Communicate about What? 299

        Aptitude as a Grading Factor 300

        Effort as a Grading Factor 303

        Compliance as a Grading Factor 306

        Communicate about Achievement Only in the Academic Grade 308

        Report on Other Factors Separately 309

        A Word about Grading in a Cooperative Learning Context 309

    Summarizing Assessment Information 309

        Step 1: Use the Most Current Information 310

        Step 2: Verify Accuracy of Evidence 311

        Step 3: Convert Entries to a Common Scale 311

        Step 4: Weight Information as Needed 311

        Step 5: Combine Information Thoughtfully 312

    Converting Rubric Scores to Grades 313

        Average Ratings 313

        Identifying a Pattern of Ratings 314

    Combining Rubric Ratings with Other Assessment Information 316

    Reporting the Final Grade 317

        Keep the Link to Learning Targets 317

        Inform Students in Advance of Your Grading Procedures 318

    Summary: Communicating with Report Card Grades 319

    Suggested Activities 320

Chapter 12 Effective Communication with Conferences 324

    Chapter 12 Learning Targets 324

    Conference Options 325

    Feedback Conferences 327

        The Purpose for a Feedback Conference 327

        Materials Needed 328

        The Protocol for a Feedback Conference 328

    Goal-Setting Conferences 330

        The Purpose for a Goal-Setting Conference 330

        Materials Needed 332

        The Protocol for a Goal-Setting Conference 333

    Achievement Conferences 335

        The Purpose of an Achievement Conference 335

        The Protocol for an Achievement Conference 338

        Follow-Up 339

    Intervention Conferences 339

        The Purpose of an Intervention Conference 340

        Materials Needed for an Intervention Conference 340

        The Protocol for an Intervention Conference 341

    Summary: Conferences as Effective Communication 342

    Suggested Activities 343

Appendix A Assessing Dispositions 346

Appendix B Understanding Standardized Tests 355

References 366

Credits 368

Index 369

 

Editorial Reviews

From reviews of the text:     “The text clearly lays out assessment design for beginners. It is clear and easy to read. . . . The overall clarity of the text makes this textbook an important tool in educating pre-service teachers.” Xyanthe Neider, Washington State University     “The overall theme of this text is that assessment is a deliberate, thoughtful process done on many levels that can enhance and guide the instructional process. The text moves students from the general (What is assessment?) to the specific (How do you create a multiple choice test that will provide valid and reliable data?), helping students understand the vital connection between instruction and assessment along the way. . . .  The focus on assessment for learning . . . is an important way of considering assessment that most students do not think about. . . .  As school districts begin using the Common Core standards, incorporating assessment for learning should become an important component of instruction. This text helps students understand the many facets of thinking about assessment this way and helps them learn how to design their assessments to be used in this way.” Leigh Ausband, UNC Charlotte     “This text is a valuable addition to . . . classroom assessment textbooks because of its focus on promoting assessment for learning. . . . [M]any existing textbooks do not use this terminology (assessment for, of, and as learning) rather [they] rely on more traditional notions of formative and summative assessment. The newer terminology brings with it more contemporary uses and conceptions of assessment that serve a mandate to support learning through integrated assessments. This message is made clear throughout the text. I also appreciate that the textbook draws on traditional teachings in assessment to establish that assessment for learning does not require a whole new set of assessment techniques. . . . [This text] advances an important (new) mission for educational assessment. I hope it is widely adopted, as I believe it has the capacity to reshape teacher candidates’ conceptions of assessment as a central teaching and learning tool.” Christopher DeLuca, University of South Florida