Introduction To The Study Of International Law; Designed As An Aid In Teaching, And In Historical…

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byTheodore Dwight Woolsey

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...assimilated to the envoys from temporal powers. In France by the concordat of 1801, all intermeddling with the affairs of the Gallicau church was prohibited to them, by whatever name they went. In regard to the question as to the rank of the minister who shall represent a state at a particular court, the general rule is that one of such rank and title is sent, as has been usually received from the other party; and that the sovereigns having a royal title neither send nor receive ministers of the first rank from inferior pow-ers.f In regard to diplomatic etiquette, Dr. Wheaton observes that while it is in great part a code of manners, and not of laws, there are certain rules, the breach of which may hinder the performance of more serious duties. Such is the rule requiring a reciprocation of diplomatic visits between ministers resident at the same court. As for the ceremonial of courts an ambassador is to regard himself the representative of national politeness and goodwill, but to submit to no ceremony abroad which would he accounted degrading at home; for nothing can he demanded of him inconsistent with the honor of his country. A question somewhat agitated among us, who have no distinct costume for the chief magistrate or for those who wait on him, is, In what costume should our diplomatic agents appear at foreign courts? In none other, it may be answered, than such as is appropriate when we pay our respects to the President of the United States, unless another is expressly prescribed. The rule is to emanate from home, and not from abroad; and no rule, it is to he hoped, will ever be given out, inconsistent with the severe simplicity of a nation without a court. Comp. Heffter, § 208. t Heffter, 209. An ambassador may be recalled, or...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...assimilated to the envoys from temporal powers. In France by the concordat of 1801, all intermeddling with the ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:124 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.26 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217492827

ISBN - 13:9780217492829

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