Introduction To The Theories And Varieties Of Modern Crime In Financial Markets: Forensic…

Hardcover | November 23, 2015

byMarius-cristian FrunzaEditorMarius-cristian Frunza

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Introduction to the Theories and Varieties of Modern Crime in Financial Markets explores statistical methods and data mining techniques that, if used correctly, can help with crime detection and prevention. The three sections of the book present the methods, techniques, and approaches for recognizing, analyzing, and ultimately detecting and preventing financial frauds, especially complex and sophisticated crimes that characterize modern financial markets. The first two sections appeal to readers with technical backgrounds, describing data analysis and ways to manipulate markets and commit crimes. The third section gives life to the information through a series of interviews with bankers, regulators, lawyers, investigators, rogue traders, and others. The book is sharply focused on analyzing the origin of a crime from an economic perspective, showing Big Data in action, noting both the pros and cons of this approach. Provides an analytical/empirical approach to financial crime investigation, including data sources, data manipulation, and conclusions that data can provide Emphasizes case studies, primarily with experts, traders, and investigators worldwide Uses R for statistical examples

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From the Publisher

Introduction to the Theories and Varieties of Modern Crime in Financial Markets explores statistical methods and data mining techniques that, if used correctly, can help with crime detection and prevention. The three sections of the book present the methods, techniques, and approaches for recognizing, analyzing, and ultimately detectin...

From the Jacket

Statistical methods and data mining techniques, if used correctly, can help crime detection and prevention. Three sections of this book present the methods, techniques, and approaches for recognizing, analyzing, and ultimately detecting and preventing financial frauds, especially complex and sophisticated ones that characterize modern ...

Dr. Marius-Cristian Frunza's consulting work with investment banks and asset managers allowed him to specialize in risk management, derivative pricing and hedging. His research activity encompasses topics around environmental finance like forestry, energy, and weather derivatives. He graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris and ...

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Kobo ebook|Dec 9 2015

$106.29 online$138.00list price(save 22%)
Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:November 23, 2015Publisher:Academic PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0128012218

ISBN - 13:9780128012215

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

  1. Prologue
  2. Short history of financial markets
  3. Origin of crime on Wall Street
  4. Typologies of crime on financial markets
  5. Modern financial crime
  6. Bibliography
  7. Interviews

Editorial Reviews

"'Follow the money' is not just a popular catchphrase, it's also the rule of thumb for those interested in financial market crimes. Add to this the analysis of data with a great statistical tool available to all and you have a book definitely worth reading."--Marco Cremonini, University of Milan "The applied focus on the role and methods of crime analysts is a much needed addition to the literature on financial crime, which tends to emphasize sociological aspects. This volume is most welcome at a time when the industry is tackling 'Big Data' and generating strong demand for analysts with solid quantitative skills."--Matthew Hickman, Seattle University