Inventing Polemic: Religion, Print, and Literary Culture in Early Modern England by Jesse M. LanderInventing Polemic: Religion, Print, and Literary Culture in Early Modern England by Jesse M. Lander

Inventing Polemic: Religion, Print, and Literary Culture in Early Modern England

byJesse M. Lander

Paperback | September 24, 2009

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Jesse Lander explores the development of the book in early modern England as both a physical object and a platform for debate and polemic. Wide-ranging in its consideration of texts, from Foxe's Acts and Monuments, Milton's Areopagitica and Hamlet to ephemeral polemical pamphlets from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the volume recasts the historical and theological contexts of early modern English literature.

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Title:Inventing Polemic: Religion, Print, and Literary Culture in Early Modern EnglandFormat:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:September 24, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521120241

ISBN - 13:9780521120241

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Table of Contents

Introduction: The disorder of books; 1. Foxe's Books of Martyrs: printing and popularizing the Actes and Monuments; 2. Martin Marprelate and the fugitive text; 3. 'Whole Hamlets': Q1, Q2, and the work of distinction; 4. Printing Donne: poetry and polemic in the early seventeenth century; 5. Areopagitica and 'The True Warfaring Christian'; 6. Institutionalizing polemic: the rise and fall of Chelsea College; Epilogue: Polite learning.

Editorial Reviews

Review of the hardback: '... there is a real contribution to several debates here, and this study opens up an illuminating perspective on some key aspects of the period.' The Glass