Irish Periodical Culture, 1937-1972: Genre in Ireland, Wales, and Scotland by M. Ballin

Irish Periodical Culture, 1937-1972: Genre in Ireland, Wales, and Scotland

byM. Ballin

Hardcover | September 19, 2008

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Irish Periodical Culture redefines the contribution of periodicals to the social and intellectual history of Ireland in the developmental decades following the crises of the revolutionary and civil wars. In her foreword to the book, Claire Connolly shows how Ballin analyzes the networks of writers, editors, and readers involved in the creative processes of production while he tells the stories of the rich social and cultural lives of periodicals. Paying special attention to the salient characteristics of the Review, The Miscellany, and The Little Magazine, Ballin illustrates their histories in comprehensive examples drawn from Ireland and England. This book provides distinctive insights into genre’s role in periodicals through a comparison with the behaviors of periodicals in Northern Ireland, Wales, and Scotland and is able to elucidate the long range significance of periodicals.

About The Author

Malcolm Ballin is a Research Associate, Cardiff University. His research focuses on literary journalism, concentrated on Irish, Welsh, and Scottish periodicals. Before his career in academia, he worked in the steel industry and retired in 1996 as the Director of Human Resources for British Steel.
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Details & Specs

Title:Irish Periodical Culture, 1937-1972: Genre in Ireland, Wales, and ScotlandFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.03 inPublished:September 19, 2008Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230605516

ISBN - 13:9780230605510

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“In using genre both as a typological and topological marker for the production of periodicals in Ireland, Wales, and Scotland over a period spanning the whole of the twentieth-century, Ballin convincingly charts the rich, diverse, and only partly explored territory of periodical production. By inventorying and offering in-depth descriptions of the periodicals in their historical, social, cultural, and literary context, Ballin also paves the way for further detailed exploration of individual reviews, miscellanies, and little magazines. His pioneering scholarly account, together with the abundant bibliography he provides, will prove an invaluable resource for students, academics, and anyone else interested in this developing field of research.”--Maryvonne Boisseau, Institut du Monde Anglophone, Paris Sorbonne Nouvelle“Rigorously researched, comprehensive in scope, scholarly yet accessible, Irish Periodical Culture 1937-1972 represents a highly significant contribution both to the field of Irish Studies and to research into genre. Ballin’s judicious analysis of the aspirations and preoccupations of editors, contributors, and their audiences, and meticulous examination of the publication scene and process cast considerable light on Irish cultural history at key junctures in the twentieth-century. The book is not merely illuminating in what it has to say about the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland; it is enriched by Ballin’s alertness to what is distinctive in Northern and southern Irish, Welsh, and Scottish cultures and to the dialogue between them.”--Michael Parker, University of Central Lancashire