Irving Vs. Irving: Canada's Feuding Billionaires And The Stories They Won't Tell by Jacques PoitrasIrving Vs. Irving: Canada's Feuding Billionaires And The Stories They Won't Tell by Jacques Poitras

Irving Vs. Irving: Canada's Feuding Billionaires And The Stories They Won't Tell

byJacques Poitras

Paperback | September 1, 2015

Pricing and Purchase Info

$22.00

Earn 110 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Available in stores

about

The inside story of how these ambitious, often ruthless entrepreneurs came to dominate the economic and political affairs of Atlantic Canada, and how they learned to love the property that perplexed them most: their media monopoly
     They are Canada's third wealthiest family and one of the largest private landowners in the U.S.A. ... And yet they operate almost entirely in secret.
     They are the Irvings. And they have always placed a premium on discretion and family unity. They built their empire--which includes Canada's largest refinery, soon to be linked by pipeline to Alberta's oil fields--by remaining private. The Irvings also control all of New Brunswick's English daily newspapers, which often allowed the family's business pursuits to escape journalistic scrutiny. In Irving vs. Irving, veteran journalist Jacques Poitras tells the story of how these ambitious, often ruthless entrepreneurs came to dominate the economic and political affairs of Atlantic Canada, and how they learned to love the property that perplexed them most: their media monopoly.
JACQUES POITRAS has been the provincial affairs reporter for CBC News in New Brunswick since 2000. He is the author of three previous books: The Right Fight: Bernard Lord and the Conservative Dilemma, Beaverbrook: A Shattered Legacy, which was a finalist for the BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction, and Imaginary Line: Life on an...
Loading
Title:Irving Vs. Irving: Canada's Feuding Billionaires And The Stories They Won't TellFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 8.18 × 5.24 × 0.93 inPublished:September 1, 2015Publisher:Penguin CanadaLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0143189956

ISBN - 13:9780143189954

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very well-written! If you like TV dramas, this story will captivate you in similar ways! The feud of the Irving family affects so many people who have likely never met them -- specifically, employees of Irving-owned/operated companies -- and this feud really illustrates how much they care about humanity (not at all). Their inability to treat each other with compassion and care trickles down into how the average person sees them. Brilliant read.
Date published: 2017-04-09

Read from the Book

The newspapers would eventually falter in telling that story of family upheaval and business transformation, because they were inextricably part of it. Next to the other Irving operations − pulp mills, the oil refinery, logging operations, trucking, shipbuilding – the papers were tiny. But K.C.’s death, Neil Reynolds’s arrival as editor, and the popularization of the internet would transform them, to the point that they would prove contentious themselves when the empire began to fracture. As rivalries and resentment grew among the next generation of Irvings, one of their own – a great-grandchild of K.C. – would take direct control of the news business for the first time. This in turn would revive the debate about editorial control, even as a rift in the family grew wider.   By 2013 it was clear that K.C. had failed, with is will, to impose unity and harmony on his family – that he had failed, as the 1993 headline had put it, to make them “behave themselves.”

Editorial Reviews

"Deftly recounts the tale of Canada's third-richest family." --The Chronicle-Herald"Since the Irvings ... own most of the province's newspapers, there were always questions about how the family's business was being covered by the press. In Irving vs. Irving ... Poitras attempts to set the record straight." --Maclean's"A thorough ... often amusing look at a province where economy is massively reliant on a single family and where the family, its billions aside, persists in seeing itself as a humble lot trying to earn 'enough for a hamburger now and again.'" --Toronto Star