Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?: When Celebrity Culture And Science Clash

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?: When Celebrity Culture And Science Clash

by Timothy Caulfield

Penguin Canada | January 13, 2015 | Hardcover

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?: When Celebrity Culture And Science Clash is rated 4.33333333333333 out of 5 by 3.
Over the past few decades, celebrity culture’s grip on our society has tightened. For Timothy Caulfield, a health science expert, this culture has a measurable influence on individual life choices and health-care decisions. 

While acknowledging the pervasiveness of celebrity culture, Caulfield doesn’t mock those who enjoy it (in fact he loves celebrity culture.) But with a skeptic’s eye and a scientific lens, Caulfield identifies and debunks the messages and promises that flow from the celebrity realm, whether they are about health, diet, beauty, or what is supposed to make us happy.

As he did so convincingly in The Cure for Everything, Caulfield separates sense from nonsense and provides useable and evidence-informed advice about what actually works and what is a waste of money and time.

In typical Caulfield manner, it isn’t enough to just interview experts and read all of the current studies (which he does). He tries celebrity-recommended beauty routines and diets. After attending a modeling competition, he enrolls in an assessment/audition for a modeling agency in Hollywood. He follows celebrity Twitter feeds, reads gossip blogs and forces himself to read every issue – cover to cover – of People Magazine, for an entire year, in his quest to understand the relationship between celebrity culture and our individual health choices.

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything? is the question Caulfield sets out to answer in this fun, factual book that offers real advice.  

 

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 400 pages, 9.26 × 6.27 × 1.22 in

Published: January 13, 2015

Publisher: Penguin Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 067006758X

ISBN - 13: 9780670067589

Found in: Social and Cultural Studies

save 29%

  • In stock online
$32.00 list price

$22.42 ea online

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?: When Celebrity Culture And Science Clash

Hardcover | January 13, 2015
In stock online Available in stores
$22.42 online $32.00 (save 29%)

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Celebrity culture and science Caulfield writes a good follow-on to his book The Cure for Everything explaining how the aura of celebrities cause many people to lose the ability to think critically. He goes into exhaustive detail to show that there is almost never any research or science to show that the health and beauty tips from celebrities in popular culture actually work. Caulfield also shows how unlikely, if not random, it is for anyone to actually become a celebrity. While Caulfield is critical of celebrity culture he has some fun with it, interweaving his own journey as an almost rock star and over the hill American Idol contestant.
Date published: 2015-03-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Science is easy, comedy is hard ... Despite the humorous title, I read this book with the expectation that it would be more scientific than comedic. I got exactly what I expected. There is a lot of science (I think there were about 50 pages of references) and a bit of humor. Regardless of what you might expect, the book is definitely worth a read. After reading this book, you will likely embrace evidence-based habits. You'll stop taking glib advice from uninformed celebrities and that is worth the price of the book. As well, you might reconsider any ambition you have to be famous. Professor Caulfield presents a convincing case against "shooting for the stars". He may come across as a dream crusher, but, in reality, the book is all about living a better informed and more fulfilling life.
Date published: 2015-03-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not as impressed as the author said I would be. I have started the second section of the book. While this book does give the science and statistics behind celebrity raves, it is factual and boring rather than humorous. It includes information I already know and is in my opinion common knowledge. The author tries to be funny but he is not as he promised in his interview on CTV's The Social which is the main reason I bought the book. He was funny on the show!
Date published: 2015-03-01

– More About This Product –

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?: When Celebrity Culture And Science Clash

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?: When Celebrity Culture And Science Clash

by Timothy Caulfield

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 400 pages, 9.26 × 6.27 × 1.22 in

Published: January 13, 2015

Publisher: Penguin Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 067006758X

ISBN - 13: 9780670067589

From the Publisher

Over the past few decades, celebrity culture’s grip on our society has tightened. For Timothy Caulfield, a health science expert, this culture has a measurable influence on individual life choices and health-care decisions. 

While acknowledging the pervasiveness of celebrity culture, Caulfield doesn’t mock those who enjoy it (in fact he loves celebrity culture.) But with a skeptic’s eye and a scientific lens, Caulfield identifies and debunks the messages and promises that flow from the celebrity realm, whether they are about health, diet, beauty, or what is supposed to make us happy.

As he did so convincingly in The Cure for Everything, Caulfield separates sense from nonsense and provides useable and evidence-informed advice about what actually works and what is a waste of money and time.

In typical Caulfield manner, it isn’t enough to just interview experts and read all of the current studies (which he does). He tries celebrity-recommended beauty routines and diets. After attending a modeling competition, he enrolls in an assessment/audition for a modeling agency in Hollywood. He follows celebrity Twitter feeds, reads gossip blogs and forces himself to read every issue – cover to cover – of People Magazine, for an entire year, in his quest to understand the relationship between celebrity culture and our individual health choices.

Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything? is the question Caulfield sets out to answer in this fun, factual book that offers real advice.  

 

About the Author

TIMOTHY CAULFIELD is a professor in the Faculty of Law and the School of Public Health as well as research director of the Health Law and Science Policy Group at the University of Alberta. In recent years he has led and collaborated on a number of research projects having to do with the social challenges associated with genomic technologies, stem cell research, and the application of ethics in health sciences. He is a member of the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. He has also been involved with a number of national and international policy and research ethics committees, including Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee, Genome Canada’s Science Advisory Committee, and the Federal Panel on Research Ethics. Caulfield is a frequent speaker at academic and public gatherings. He contributes often to popular media. He lives and works out vigorously and often in Edmonton.

Editorial Reviews

“[Caulfield] thinks with an academic’s rigor and precision and knows the health maintenance territory inside out.” - The New York Times

“Caulfield’s cure for the mess we’re in is this lucid and well-researched compendium of the best-available science about diet, fitness, genetics, pharmaceuticals and alternative medicine. . . . A compelling and timely argument for science and a reminder that science is an iterative process, breakthroughs are rare, and there are no magical cures for everything.” - Julia Belluz, The National Post