Islamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern Stage by Jane Hwang DegenhardtIslamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern Stage by Jane Hwang Degenhardt

Islamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern Stage

byJane Hwang Degenhardt

Paperback | June 15, 2015

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This book explores the threat of Christian conversion to Islam in twelve early modern English plays. In works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger, and others, conversion from Christianity to Islam is represented as both tragic and erotic, as a fate worse than death and as a sexual seduction.Degenhardt examines the stage's treatment of this intercourse of faiths to reveal connections between sexuality, race, and confessional identity in early modern English drama and culture. In addition, she shows how England's encounter with Islam reanimated post-Reformation debates about theembodiment of Christian faith. As Degenhardt compellingly demonstrates, the erotics of conversion added fuel to the fires of controversies over Pauline universalism, Christian martyrdom, the efficacy of relics and rituals, and even the Knights of Malta.
Jane Hwang Degenhardt is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the co-editor (with Elizabeth Williamson) of Religion and Drama in Early Modern England.
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Title:Islamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern StageFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9.09 × 6.1 × 0.79 inPublished:June 15, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1474402372

ISBN - 13:9781474402378

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"This is a strong, exciting, and original book. Degenhardt draws deeply on contemporary sermons, ecclesiastical debates, news pamphlets, and travel literature alongside a wide range of plays in order to give a complex and lively picture of the cultures of controversy in Renaissance England." --Julia Reinhard Lupton, Professor of English, The University of California, Irvine