James Joyce and the Problem of Justice: Negotiating Sexual and Colonial Difference by Joseph ValenteJames Joyce and the Problem of Justice: Negotiating Sexual and Colonial Difference by Joseph Valente

James Joyce and the Problem of Justice: Negotiating Sexual and Colonial Difference

byJoseph Valente

Paperback | May 7, 2009

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This is the first full-length study of James Joyce to subject his work to ethical and political analysis. It addresses important issues in contemporary literary and cultural studies surrounding problems of justice, as well as discussions of gender, homosociality, and the colonial condition. Valente's focus alternates between the details of Joyce's language and the biographical and sociohistorical contexts that inform his writing, with particular attention paid to questions of race and gender.
Title:James Joyce and the Problem of Justice: Negotiating Sexual and Colonial DifferenceFormat:PaperbackDimensions:300 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:May 7, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521110459

ISBN - 13:9780521110457

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; List of abbreviations; Preface; 1. Justice unbound; 2. Joyce's sexual differend; 3. Dread desire: imperialist abjection in Giacomo Joyce; 4. Between/beyond men: male feminism and homosociality in Exiles; 5. Joyce's siren song: 'Becoming-Woman' in Ulysses; Epilogue: trial and mock trial on Joyce; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"This landmark study provides a theory of social values subtle and complex enough to show the rich development of Joyce's vision. The theories of Gilles Deleuze serve Valente's innovative argument that Ulysses moves beyond the representational style of ots first half, which is geared to masculine values, into counter-representational styles in the second half that spring from feminine resistance. The idea that the changing styles of the second half enact the beginning of woman, which then aims at the production of new combinations, provides a striking new perspective....Valente's dense, coherent book is one of the best Joyce studies of the 1990s." Journal of Modern Literature