Jane Austens Art of Memory by Jocelyn HarrisJane Austens Art of Memory by Jocelyn Harris

Jane Austens Art of Memory

byJocelyn Harris

Paperback | September 18, 2003

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Jane Austen's Art of Memory offers a radical new thesis about Jane Austen's construction of her art. It argues that, with the help of her tenacious memory, she engaged in friendly dialogue with her predecessors, the English writers, a process that the eighteenth century called 'imitation'. Her allusions, far from being random, thicken and complicate her novels in a manner that is poetic rather than mimetic. Difficult critical cruxes resolve when her books are set within her own great tradition which included Locke, Richardson, Milton, Shakespeare, and (unexpectedly) Chaucer, and she is found to be an educated and supremely conscious writer.

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Title:Jane Austens Art of MemoryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:284 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.63 inPublished:September 18, 2003Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521542073

ISBN - 13:9780521542074

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Northanger Abbey; 2. The return to Richardson; 3. Sense and Sensibility; 4. Pride and Prejudice; 5. Mansfield Park; 6. Emma; 7. Persuasion conclusion: nothing will come of nothing; Appendices; Index.

Editorial Reviews

' ... a genuinely original work, and one of considerable interest for what it has to teach us about a major writer. What it offers is a rather rare thing: a 'new' Jane Austen, who was not merely open in 'influences' from her desultory reading but had read certain authors intensely and creatively, almost as Keats read Shakespeare or Eliot read Dante. The book is no less than a recreation of substantial areas of Jane Austen's mental and imaginative life.' Norman Page, University of Nottingham