Japan's Nuclear Crisis: The Routes to Responsibility by S. Carpenter

Japan's Nuclear Crisis: The Routes to Responsibility

byS. Carpenter

Hardcover | December 12, 2011

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Investigation of the disaster will pose questions regarding why Daiichi was constructed in an earthquake-prone zone and was still operating despite problems that had been plaguing the reactors since 1989 such as cracks in infrastructure and leaks in radioactivity. This book analyses and explores the impact of Japans 2011 nuclear crisis.

About The Author

Susan Carpenter is the managing director of International Markets Analysts Limited. She has worked for Japanese business and government organizations and also served as the Director of the MSc in International Business and Emerging Markets at the University of Edinburgh Business School. Her previous publications include Special Corpor...
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Details & Specs

Title:Japan's Nuclear Crisis: The Routes to ResponsibilityFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.02 inPublished:December 12, 2011Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230354920

ISBN - 13:9780230354920

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction
Definition of the Ministries' IAIs, Including Historical Development. Ministries Involved in Nuclear Sector and Their IAIs.
Portrait of Japan's Current Political Environment
Japan's Pre-earthquake Economy
METI's Electric Development Power Corp
Ehime. Aomori, Fukushima and MOX: Prefectural Acceptance of Ministerial 'Guidance' in Return for Public Works Projects
Don't Blame the Bureaucrats Blame the System
Conclusion