Jews in Nazi Berlin: From Kristallnacht to Liberation by Beate MeyerJews in Nazi Berlin: From Kristallnacht to Liberation by Beate Meyer

Jews in Nazi Berlin: From Kristallnacht to Liberation

EditorBeate Meyer

Hardcover | December 15, 2009

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Though many of the details of Jewish life under Hitler are familiar, historical accounts rarely afford us a real sense of what it was like for Jews and their families to live in the shadow of Nazi Germany’s oppressive racial laws and growing violence. With Jews in Nazi Berlin, those individual lives—and the constant struggle they required—come fully into focus, and the result is an unprecedented and deeply moving portrait of a people.

Drawing on a remarkably rich archive that includes photographs, objects, official documents, and personal papers, the editors of Jews in Nazi Berlin have assembled a multifaceted picture of Jewish daily life in the Nazi capital during the height of the regime’s power. The book’s essays and images are divided into thematic sections, each representing a different aspect of the experience of Jews in Berlin, covering such topics as emigration, the yellow star, Zionism, deportation, betrayal, survival, and more. To supplement—and, importantly, to humanize—the comprehensive documentary evidence, the editors draw on an extensive series of interviews with survivors of the Nazi persecution, who present gripping first-person accounts of the innovation, subterfuge, resilience, and luck required to negotiate the increasing brutality of the regime.

A stunning reconstruction of a storied community as it faced destruction, Jews in Nazi Berlin renders that loss with a startling immediacy that will make it an essential part of our continuing attempts to understand World War II and the Holocaust.

Beate Meyer is a researcher at the Institute for the History of German Jews in Hamburg. Hermann Simon is the director of the New Synagogue Berlin–Centrum Judaicum Foundation. Chana Schütz is research associate at and vice-director of the New Synagogue Berlin–Centrum Judaicum Foundation.
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Title:Jews in Nazi Berlin: From Kristallnacht to LiberationFormat:HardcoverDimensions:416 pages, 9.5 × 7.5 × 1.3 inPublished:December 15, 2009Publisher:University of Chicago PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0226521575

ISBN - 13:9780226521572

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Reviews

Table of Contents

Foreword by Hermann Simon
Editors’ Preface

PART ONE: 1938

1 1938: The Year of Fate
Hermann Simon
2 The Juni-Aktion (June Operation) in Berlin
Christian Dirks

PART TWO: Emigration
3 The Flight and Expulsion of German Jews
Michael Schäbitz

PART THREE: Aryanization
4 “Aryanized” and Financially Ruined: The Garbáty Family
Beate Meyer

PART FOUR: The Yellow Star
5 Berlin Jews: Deprived of Rights, Impoverished, and Branded
Albert Meirer
6 The Jüdisches Nachrichtenblatt, 1938–43
Clemens Maier

PART FIVE: Zionists
7 אף על פי כן (In Spite of Everything):   Zionists in Berlin
Chana Schütz

PART SIX: Forced Labor
8 Forced Labor
Diana Schulle
9 The Rosenstrasse Protest
Diana Schulle

PART SEVEN: Deportation
10 The Deportations
Beate Meyer
11 Every Person Has a Name
Rita Meyhöfer
12 The Opera Singer Therese Rothauser
Alexandra von Pfuhlstein
13 Sad Experiences in the Hell of Nazi Germany: The Scheurenberg Family
Christian Dirks
14 Ruth Schwersenz’s Poesiealbum
Karin Wieckhorst

PART EIGHT: Betrayal
15 Snatchers: The Berlin Gestapo’s Jewish Informants
Christian Dirks

PART NINE: Survival
16 How the Frankenstein Family Survived Underground, 1943–45
Barbara Schieb
17. Banished from the Fatherland: How Hans Rosenthal Survived the Nazi Regime
Michael Schäbitz

PART TEN: Jewish Organizations
18 The Fine Line between Responsible Action and Collaboration: The Reichsvereinigung der Juden in Deutschland and the Jewish Community in Berlin, 1938–45
Beate Meyer
19 Oranienburger Strasse 28–31
Diana Schulle

Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Glossary
Contributors Name Index

Editorial Reviews

"An amazing volume of facts and personal accounts. . . . Accompanying these accounts of destruction is a stunning collection of photos and documents."