Job the Silent: A Study in Historical Counterpoint by Bruce ZuckermanJob the Silent: A Study in Historical Counterpoint by Bruce Zuckerman

Job the Silent: A Study in Historical Counterpoint

byBruce Zuckerman

Paperback | January 1, 1998

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Offering an original reading of the book of Job, one of the great literary classics of biblical literature, this book develops a new analogical method for understanding how biblical texts evolve in the process of transmission. Zuckerman argues that the book of Job was intended as a parodyprotesting the stereotype of the traditional righteous sufferer as patient and silent. He compares the book of Job and its fate to that of a famous Yiddish short story, "Bontsye Shvayg," another covert parody whose protagonist has come to be revered as a paradigm of innocent Jewish suffering.Zuckerman uses the story to prove how a literary text becomes separated from the intention of its author, and takes on quite a different meaning for a specific community of readers.

About The Author

Bruce Zuckerman is at University of Southern California.
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Title:Job the Silent: A Study in Historical CounterpointFormat:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 9.09 × 5.98 × 0.91 inPublished:January 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195121279

ISBN - 13:9780195121278

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From Our Editors

One of the great literary classics of biblical literature, the book of Job is best know as a story which exemplifies the virtue of patience in the face of suffering. Indeed, the patience of Job is so well celebrated as to be a cliche. But here one encounters a problem; for throughout the greater art of the book that bears his name, Job is clearly one of the most impatient characters in the Bible.

Editorial Reviews

"[An] excellent book."--The Journal of Religion