Joe Orton

by Susan Rusinko

Twayne Publishers | August 1, 1995 | Hardcover

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In this penetrating analysis of Orton's writing, Susan Rusinko uses as a point of departure the image of Orton as clown and trickster, following in the tradition of the Lord of Misrule. She intersperses her analysis of Orton's three landmark plays with commentary on his four short plays for radio and television (two later revised for the stage), his posthumously published novel, his published but unproduced film script for the Beatles, his sketch for Kenneth Tynan's Oh, Calcutta!, and his renowned Diaries, published posthumously in 1986, wherein much of the nature of his outsider's take on society is revealed. Rusinko argues that Orton, Pinter, and Stoppard belong to the tradition of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, as reinvigorators of stage language not in evidence since the Renaissance. She places Orton in the rebellious tradition of such writers as Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe, William Wycherley, and William Congreve, noting that, like that of the emigres Joyce and Beckett, Orton's rebellion took shape only when, at the age of 17, he left his middle-class hometown of Leicester for good.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 137 pages, 8.8 × 5.77 × 0.72 in

Published: August 1, 1995

Publisher: Twayne Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0805770348

ISBN - 13: 9780805770346

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– More About This Product –

Joe Orton

Joe Orton

by Susan Rusinko

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 137 pages, 8.8 × 5.77 × 0.72 in

Published: August 1, 1995

Publisher: Twayne Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0805770348

ISBN - 13: 9780805770346

From the Publisher

In this penetrating analysis of Orton's writing, Susan Rusinko uses as a point of departure the image of Orton as clown and trickster, following in the tradition of the Lord of Misrule. She intersperses her analysis of Orton's three landmark plays with commentary on his four short plays for radio and television (two later revised for the stage), his posthumously published novel, his published but unproduced film script for the Beatles, his sketch for Kenneth Tynan's Oh, Calcutta!, and his renowned Diaries, published posthumously in 1986, wherein much of the nature of his outsider's take on society is revealed. Rusinko argues that Orton, Pinter, and Stoppard belong to the tradition of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, as reinvigorators of stage language not in evidence since the Renaissance. She places Orton in the rebellious tradition of such writers as Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe, William Wycherley, and William Congreve, noting that, like that of the emigres Joyce and Beckett, Orton's rebellion took shape only when, at the age of 17, he left his middle-class hometown of Leicester for good.

From Our Editors

In this penetrating analysis of Orton's writing, Susan Rusinko uses as a point of departure the image of Orton as clown and trickster, following in the tradition of the Lord of Misrule. She intersperses her analysis of Orton's three landmark plays with commentary on his four short plays for radio and television (two later revised for the stage), his posthumously published novel, his published but unproduced film script for the Beatles, his sketch for Kenneth Tynan's Oh, Calcutta!, and his renowned Diaries, published posthumously in 1986, wherein much of the nature of his outsider's take on society is revealed. Rusinko argues that Orton, Pinter, and Stoppard belong to the tradition of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, as reinvigorators of stage language not in evidence since the Renaissance. She places Orton in the rebellious tradition of such writers as Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe, William Wycherley, and William Congreve, noting that, like that of the emigres Joyce and Beckett, Orton's rebellion took shape only when, at the age of 17, he left his middle-class ho