John The Baptist In Life And Death: Audience-oriented Criticism Of Matthew's Narrative by Gary YamasakiJohn The Baptist In Life And Death: Audience-oriented Criticism Of Matthew's Narrative by Gary Yamasaki

John The Baptist In Life And Death: Audience-oriented Criticism Of Matthew's Narrative

byGary Yamasaki

Hardcover | November 1, 1998

Pricing and Purchase Info

$206.62 online 
$217.00 list price
Earn 1,033 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In a narrative about Jesus, a character like John the Baptist would not be expected to play a role much beyond that of providing a baptism for Jesus. Yet the Matthaean narrator finds several other uses for John in the development of the narrative, not only while he is still alive, but also after he is dead. In examining John's role, Yamasaki deploys an audience-oriented critical methodology, an approach that chronicles the narrator's efforts to influence first-time readers' experience of the narrative as they proceed sequentially through the text. He traces John's characterization as 'forerunner', from a glowing introduction in ch. 3-albeit with a slight flaw in his ideological point of view on Jesus-through a progressive exacerbation of this flaw, to a rehabilitation of John in ch. 11. As a result of this rehabilitation, the narrator is able to continue to use John in his role as forerunner in the second half of the narrative, even after John's death has removed him from the story-line.
Gary Yamasaki is Associate Professor of New Testament at Columbia Bible College, Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada.
Loading
Title:John The Baptist In Life And Death: Audience-oriented Criticism Of Matthew's NarrativeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:178 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.43 inPublished:November 1, 1998Publisher:BloomsburyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1850759162

ISBN - 13:9781850759164

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dense... I've read this book nine times over the last couple of years. Why? Because simply put, reading this book(which is a revision of Gary's doctoral dissertation) is not an easy book to read...He uses twenty dollar words when a two dollar word would have sufficed (intellectual egotism?), he continues on one point eons after the point has significantly been made, and then at times he repeats it all over again. So why continue reading it even twice, let alone nine times? Beyond the self-imposed excess that this book contains, lies a brilliant summary of everything that everyone over the last number of centuries has written, debated, and/or stated about the man called John The Baptist, especially as it relates to the Book Of Matthew. I'd love to say that it is well written, but that would be a lie. It is however well researched, and within the confines of the overly intellectual mumbo jumbo (that Gary no doubt added just to impress his professors) there is most definitely a score of information that is quite useful and illuminating. The trick however is disseminating that information from the literal excess that he has surrounded it with. But none the less, it is a good book. Not a good read, but definitely a good book! Well worth the money...
Date published: 2008-01-16