Joyce, Derrida, Lacan and the Trauma of History: Reading, Narrative, and Postcolonialism

Hardcover | October 28, 1999

byChristine van Boheemen, Christine Van Boheemen-saaf

not yet rated|write a review
Christine van Boheemen examines the relationship between Joyce's postmodern textuality and the traumatic history of colonialism in Ireland. Joyce's influence on Lacanian psychoanalysis and Derrida's philosophy, Van Boheemen suggests, ought to be viewed from a postcolonial perspective. Joyce's writing bears witness to a history that remains unspeakable, functioning as a material location for the inner voice of Irish cultural memory. This book engages with a wide range of contemporary critical theory and brings Joyce's work into dialogue with thinkers such as Zizek, Adorno, Lyotard, as well as feminism and postcolonial theory.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$115.93 online
$115.95 list price
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From Our Editors

Colonialism in Ireland played an important role in the works of literary figures of this period. In Joyce, Derrida, Lacan, and the Trauma of History, Christine van Boheemen examines the relationship between Joyce’s postmodern textuality and the traumatic history of colonialism in Ireland. Joyce’s writing takes on an even greater signif...

From the Publisher

Christine van Boheemen examines the relationship between Joyce's postmodern textuality and the traumatic history of colonialism in Ireland. Joyce's influence on Lacanian psychoanalysis and Derrida's philosophy, Van Boheemen suggests, ought to be viewed from a postcolonial perspective. Joyce's writing bears witness to a history that rem...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:October 28, 1999Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052166036X

ISBN - 13:9780521660365

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; List of abbreviations; 1. The stolen birthright: the mimesis of original loss; 2. Representation in a postcolonial symbolic; 3. The language of the outlaw; 4. The primitive scene of representation: writing gender; 5. Materiality in Derrida, Lacan, and Joyce's embodied text; Conclusion: Joyce's anamorphic mirror; Bibliography; Index.

From Our Editors

Colonialism in Ireland played an important role in the works of literary figures of this period. In Joyce, Derrida, Lacan, and the Trauma of History, Christine van Boheemen examines the relationship between Joyce’s postmodern textuality and the traumatic history of colonialism in Ireland. Joyce’s writing takes on an even greater significance because it bears witness to a history that remains unspeakable to this day.

Editorial Reviews

Boheemen-Saff's claims are big, her language is dense, and the allusions to major 20th-century thinkers are many; those who like such language and insights will find this is a brilliant study aboust how literature wpeaks to the pshychological and linguistic consequences of colonialism. S. Browner, Choice