Judge Dee At Work: Eight Chinese Detective Stories by Robert van GulikJudge Dee At Work: Eight Chinese Detective Stories by Robert van Gulik

Judge Dee At Work: Eight Chinese Detective Stories

byRobert van Gulik

Paperback | April 15, 2007

Pricing and Purchase Info

$14.13 online 
$15.95 list price save 11%
Earn 71 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The eight short stories in Judge Dee at Work cover a decade during which the judge served in four different provinces of the T’ang Empire. From the suspected treason of a general in the Chinese army to the murder of a lonely poet in his garden pavilion, the cases here are among the most memorable in the Judge Dee series.
Robert van Gulik (1910–67) was a Dutch diplomat and an authority on Chinese history and culture. His many works include sixteen Judge Dee mysteries, a study of the gibbon in China, and two books on the Chinese lute.
Loading
Title:Judge Dee At Work: Eight Chinese Detective StoriesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:184 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.6 inPublished:April 15, 2007Publisher:University Of Chicago Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0226848663

ISBN - 13:9780226848662

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Five Auspicious Clouds
2. The Red Tape Murder
3. He Came with the Rain
4. The Murder on the Lotus Pond
5. The Two Beggars
6. The Wrong Sword
7. The Coffins of the Emperor
8. Murder on New Year's Eve
Colophon
Judge Dee Chronology

From Our Editors

"If you have not yet discovered Judge Dee and his faithful Sgt. Hoong, I envy you that initial pleasure which comes from the discovery of a great detective story. For the magistrate of Poo-yang belongs in that select group of fictional detectives headed by the renowned Sherlock Holmes" -- Robert Kirsch, Los Angeles Times

Editorial Reviews

“Judge Dee belongs in that select group of fictional detectives headed by the renowned Sherlock Holmes. I assure you it is a compliment not given frivolously.”