Jung's Evolving Views of Nazi Germany: From the Nazi Takeover to the End of World War II by William SchoenlJung's Evolving Views of Nazi Germany: From the Nazi Takeover to the End of World War II by William Schoenl

Jung's Evolving Views of Nazi Germany: From the Nazi Takeover to the End of World War II

byWilliam Schoenl

Paperback | November 25, 2016

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Jung’s Evolving Views of Nazi Germany:  From the Nazi Takeover to the End of World War II describes for the first time Jung’s views of Nazi Germany during the whole period from the Nazi takeover in 1933 to the end of World War II.  It brings together the authors’ research in archives and primary sources during the past 10 years. 

It is untenable to hold that Jung was a "Nazi sympathizer" after Nazi Germany's first year. In spring 1934 he entered into a transition during which he became warier of the Nazis and of statements that might be construed as anti-Semitic. From 1934 to 1939 he became increasingly warier of the Nazis. His views were strongly anti-Nazi in relation to events during World War II.

Title:Jung's Evolving Views of Nazi Germany: From the Nazi Takeover to the End of World War IIFormat:PaperbackDimensions:100 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.24 inPublished:November 25, 2016Publisher:Chiron PublicationsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1630514071

ISBN - 13:9781630514075

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Table of Contents

ContentsPreface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vAcknowledgements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ixChapter 1. Nazi Germany's First Year and Jung's Transition:1933-Spring 1934 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Chapter 2. From 1934 to Nazi Germany's Invasion of Poland(1939). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19Chapter 3. The World War II Years: 1939-1945. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Chapter 4. Epilogue: Post-War Attacks on Jung: 1945-1946 . . . 51References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

Editorial Reviews

"The Schoenls have written a carefully researched survey of Jung's attitudes toward Germany from 1933 to 1945 based on primary and secondary documents from which they draw balanced and nuanced conclusions. This book is an important contribution to the literature on the topic of Jung and anti-Semitism, which has occupied the minds of Jungian scholars and analysts for decades and to this day continues to be an obstacle in the way of Jung's positive reception in the academic world. The Schoenls show most importantly the change in Jung's position during this period from one shadowed with professional opportunism to one of increasing clarity and critical opposition to the Nazi government. This book walks the delicate path between the extremes of hostile judgment and blind denial, weighing evidence and maintaining scholarly objectivity. For this the authors are to be commended. I recommend this book for people who are serious students of Jung and the history of analytical psychology." -Murray Stein, Ph.D."William and Linda Schoenl's work offers an accurate, concise, and comprehensible presentation of Jung's view and interpretation of Nazi Germany. Thanks to an exhaustive enquiry in several unpublished primary sources, the authors have the merit to focus the reader's attention on the evolution in the understanding of a dramatic phase of postmodernity by a remarkable observer of the social, cultural, and political issues of its Zeitgeist. It contributes in a significant manner to an ongoing and often polarized debate, which calls psychologists and historians to a common effort."-Giovanni Sorge, Research Commission of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich