Jung's Seminar on Nietzsche's "Zarathustra": (Abridged edition) by James L. JarrettJung's Seminar on Nietzsche's "Zarathustra": (Abridged edition) by James L. Jarrett

Jung's Seminar on Nietzsche's "Zarathustra": (Abridged edition)

EditorJames L. Jarrett

Paperback | November 23, 1997

Pricing and Purchase Info

$43.26 online 
$68.95 list price save 37%
Earn 216 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Nietzsche's infamous workThus Spake Zarathustrais filled with a strange sense of religiosity that seems to run counter to the philosopher's usual polemics against religious faith. For some scholars, this book marks little but a mental decline in the great philosopher; for C. G. Jung,Zarathustrawas an invaluable demonstration of the unconscious at work, one that illuminated both Nietzsche's psychology and spirituality and that of the modern world in general. The original two-volume edition of Jung's lively seminar on Nietzsche'sZarathustrahas been an important source for specialists in depth psychology. This new abridged paperback edition allows interested readers to participate with Jung as he probes the underlying meaning of Nietzsche's great work.

James L. Jarrettis Professor of the Philosophy of Education at the University of California, Berkeley.
Loading
Title:Jung's Seminar on Nietzsche's "Zarathustra": (Abridged edition)Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 23, 1997Publisher:Princeton University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0691017387

ISBN - 13:9780691017389

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

FOREWORD
INTRODUCTION
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
A NOTE ON THE TEXT
MEMBERS OF THE SEMINAR
LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC ABBREVIATIONS
SPRING TERM: MAY/JUNE 1934
Lecture I: 2 May 1934
Lecture II: 9 May 1934
Lecture III: 16 May 1934
Lecture IV: 23 May 1934
Lecture VI: 13 June 1934
Lecture VII: 20 June 1934
Lecture VIII: 27 June 1934
AUTUMN TERM: OCTOBER/DECEMBER 1934
Lecture I: 10 October 1934
WINTER TERM: JANUARY/MARCH 1935
Lecture II: 30 January 1935
Lecture IV: 13 February 1935
Lecture V: 20 February 1935
Lecture VI: 27 February 1935
SPRING TERM: MAY/JUNE 1935
Lecture III: 22 May 1935
Lecture VII: 26 June 1935
AUTUMN TERM: OCTOBER/DECEMBER 1935
Lecture I: 16 October 1935
Lecture II: 23 October 1935
Lecture III: 30 October 1935
Lecture VII: 27 November 1935
Lecture IX: 11 December 1935
WINTER TERM: JANUARY/MARCH 1936
Lecture I: 22 January 1936
Lecture II: 29 January 1936
Lecture III: 5 February 1936
Lecture IV: 12 February 1936
Lecture V: 19 February 1936
SPRING TERM: MAY/JUNE 1936
Lecture II: 13 May 1936
Lecture III: 20 May 1936
Lecture IV: 27 May 1936
Lecture V: 3 June 1936
Lecture VIII: 24 June 1936
SPRING TERM: MAY/JUNE 1937
Lecture I: 5 May 1937
Lecture III: 19 May 1937
Lecture VI: 9 June 1937
Lecture VII: 16 June 1937
Lecture IX: 30 June 1937
SPRING TERM: MAY/JUNE 1938
Lecture I: 4 May 1938
Lecture III: 18 May 1938
AUTUMN TERM: OCTOBER/DECEMBER 1938
Lecture I: 19 October 1938
Lecture II: 26 October 1938
Lecture VI: 7 December 1938
WINTER TERM: JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1939
Lecture I: 18 January 1939
Lecture II: 25 January 1939
Lecture III: 1 February 1939
Lecture V: 15 February 1939
INDEX

From Our Editors

Nietzsche's infamous work Thus Spake Zarathustra is filled with a strange sense of religiosity that seems to run counter to the philosopher's usual polemics against religious faith. For some scholars, this book marks little but a mental decline in the great philosopher; for C. G. Jung, Zarathustra was an invaluable demonstration of the unconscious at work, one that illuminated both Nietzsche's psychology and spirituality and that of the modern world in general. The original two-volume edition of Jung's lively seminar on Nietzsche's Zarathustra has been an important source for specialists in depth psychology. This new abridged paperback edition allows interested readers to participate with Jung as he probes the underlying meaning of Nietzsche's great work

Editorial Reviews

"Nietzsche is perhaps the first Western man to have experienced a psychological encounter with the Self. . . . [This] seminar on Nietzsche's Zarathustra . . . [ is a] magisterial enterprise [that] demonstrates to any perceptive reader Jung's millennial magnitude."--Psychological Perspectives