Kafka: Judaism, Politics, and Literature

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byRitchie Robertson

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Kafka wrote Das Urteil, his first major work of literature, in a single night in the autumn of 1912. It was for him a breakthrough, and closely connected with it was the awakening of his interest in Jewish culture. This is a general study of Kafka, which explores the literary and historicalcontext of his writings, and links them with his emergent sense of Jewish identity. What is emphasized throughout is Kafka's concern with contemporary society - his distrust of its secular, humanitarian ideals - and his desire for a new kind of community, based on religion.

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Kafka wrote Das Urteil, his first major work of literature, in a single night in the autumn of 1912. It was for him a breakthrough, and closely connected with it was the awakening of his interest in Jewish culture. This is a general study of Kafka, which explores the literary and historicalcontext of his writings, and links them with h...

Ritchie Robertson is at Downing College, Cambridge.

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Format:PaperbackPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198158149

ISBN - 13:9780198158141

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'This monograph ... offers considerably more than a comprehensive analysis of Kafka's origins in "decadent" aestheticism, of the personal impulses and cultural contexts that shaped his beginnings as a dandy. An innovative study of Kafka's search for literature, cogent and elegantly arguedthroughout.'M. Winkler, Rice University, Choice, January 1993