Kant and the Empiricists: Understanding Understanding by Wayne WaxmanKant and the Empiricists: Understanding Understanding by Wayne Waxman

Kant and the Empiricists: Understanding Understanding

byWayne Waxman

Hardcover | March 1, 2006

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Wayne Waxman here presents an ambitious and comprehensive attempt to link the philosophers of what are known as the British Empiricists--Locke, Berkeley, and Hume--to the philosophy of German philosopher Immanuel Kant. Much has been written about all these thinkers, who are among the mostinfluential figures in the Western tradition. Waxman argues that, contrary to conventional wisdom, Kant is actually the culmination of the British empiricist program and that he shares their methodological assumptions and basic convictions about human thought and knowledge.

About The Author

Wayne Waxman is author of Kant's Model of the Mind (OUP 1991) and Hume's Theory of Consciousness (Cambridge 1994).
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Details & Specs

Title:Kant and the Empiricists: Understanding UnderstandingFormat:HardcoverDimensions:648 pages, 6.42 × 9.09 × 1.69 inPublished:March 1, 2006Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195177398

ISBN - 13:9780195177398

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Waxman is not the first to connect Kant closely with Locke, Berkeley and Hume. But he is certainly the first to dissect the connections in fine detail, and to identify one crucial continuity of method. Rarely have I read such a fine commentary on the great and good. Certainly it is anexcellent piece of work and it will be a fascinating read for anyone interested in the history of philosophy.--T. E. Wilkerson, Mind