Key Debates in Healthcare

Paperback | March 1, 2010

byGary Taylor, Helen Hawley

not yet rated|write a review
"This is an accessible text that will be a useful source for lecturers and students in the field of health studies. The material is coherently organised into three main themes: the politics of provision; setting priorities; and patients and professionals. I was particularly impressed with way in which the authors draw on theoretical insights and on the experiences of different heath care systems in their analysis."
Professor Rob Baggott, Director of the Health Policy Research Unit, De Montfort University, UK

  • Who is responsible for the health of the nation?
  • To what extent should the state tackle health inequalities?
  • Is prevention better than cure?,Key Debates in Healthcare explores the answers to these and many more topical questions in healthcare. The book considers eight main debates in healthcare, ranging from the role of the state in the provision of health care to the rights of patients, and the responsibilities each of us have for our own health.

    The book also examines the different models of health and healthcare delivery, and explores alternative methods of providing healthcare, using the state, the private sector or the voluntary sector. Through these debates the book will help readers explore issues such as health inequalities, health promotion and service delivery, and establish their own perspective on issues of health and society.

    Written as a core course book, the book includes:

    • Theoretical perspectives: to help you understand the logic and implications of broad social and political arguments related to health
    • Policy developments: to show the practical application of ideas in Britain, the United States and in other parts of the world
    • Perspectives of health professionals: to illustrate the impact of healthcare debates on professional practice
    • Healthcare scenarios: to assist you to make connections between theory, policy and practice Key Debates in Healthcare is key reading for all those training and studying to become health professionals and looking for a text to help them get to grips with the heart of healthcare provision.
  • Pricing and Purchase Info

    $55.47

    In stock online
    Ships free on orders over $25

    From the Publisher

    "This is an accessible text that will be a useful source for lecturers and students in the field of health studies. The material is coherently organised into three main themes: the politics of provision; setting priorities; and patients and professionals. I was particularly impressed with way in which the authors draw on theoretical in...

    Gary Taylor is Principal Lecturer in the Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. Helen Hawley is a public health specialist for NHS Rotherham. She also teaches on the MA in Public Health at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.

    other books by Gary Taylor

    Letters from Alabama: Chiefly Relating to Natural History
    Letters from Alabama: Chiefly Relating to Natural Histo...

    Kobo ebook|Jan 31 2013

    $35.39 online$45.87list price(save 22%)
    The Biology of Squat Lobsters
    The Biology of Squat Lobsters

    Kobo ebook|Dec 5 2011

    $222.39 online$288.71list price(save 22%)
    see all books by Gary Taylor
    Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 3.54 × 2.36 × 0.2 inPublished:March 1, 2010Publisher:McGraw-Hill EducationLanguage:English

    The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

    ISBN - 10:033522394X

    ISBN - 13:9780335223947

    Look for similar items by category:

    Customer Reviews of Key Debates in Healthcare

    Reviews

    Extra Content

    Table of Contents

    Health and health policy

    Part One: The politics of provision

    The state

    The private sector

    The voluntary sector

    Part Two: Setting priorities

    Health inequalities

    Health promotion

    Rationing

    Part Three: Patients and health professionals

    Patients' rights

    Professionalism

    Conclusion