Kierkegaards Critique of Reason and Society

Paperback | November 20, 2006

byMerold Westphal

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Merold Westphal is Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University and author of History and Truth in Hegel's "Phenomenology" (1979) and God, Guilt, and Death: An Existential Phenomenology of Religion (1987).

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Merold Westphal is Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University and author of History and Truth in Hegel's "Phenomenology" (1979) and God, Guilt, and Death: An Existential Phenomenology of Religion (1987).

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:142 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.34 inPublished:November 20, 2006Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271030208

ISBN - 13:9780271030203

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Table of Contents

Contents

Preface vii

Abbreviations xi

1. Prolegomena to Any Future Philosophy of Religion

That Will Be Able to Come Forth as Prophecy 1

2. Kierkegaard as a Prophetic Philosopher 19

3. Kierkegaard's Politics 29

4. Kierkegaard's Sociology 43

5. Abraham and Hegel 61

6. Kierkegaard and the Logic of Insanity 85

7. Inwardness and Ideology Critique in Kierkegaard's Fragments and Postscript 105

Index 127

Editorial Reviews

Kierkegaard’s Critique of Reason and Society is a pivotal event in the history of Kierkegaardian interpretation. . . . Westphal’s reading of Kierkegaard contains a polemic against two prevalent misreadings. Kierkegaard is often seen as an irrationalist, and he is often seen as an individualist. Westphal argues powerfully that both labels, as usually understood, are completely misleading.”

Christian Scholar's Review