Kill for Peace: American Artists Against the Vietnam War by Israel, MatthewKill for Peace: American Artists Against the Vietnam War by Israel, Matthew

Kill for Peace: American Artists Against the Vietnam War

byIsrael, Matthew

Paperback | July 15, 2013

Pricing and Purchase Info

$34.50

Earn 173 plum® points
HURRY, ONLY 1 LEFT!

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The Vietnam War (1964–1975) divided American society like no other war of the twentieth century, and some of the most memorable American art and art-related activism of the last fifty years protested U.S. involvement. At a time when Pop Art, Minimalism, and Conceptual Art dominated the American art world, individual artists and art collectives played a significant role in antiwar protest and inspired subsequent generations of artists. This significant story of engagement, which has never been covered in a book-length survey before, is the subject of Kill for Peace.

Writing for both general and academic audiences, Matthew Israel recounts the major moments in the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement and describes artists’ individual and collective responses to them. He discusses major artists such as Leon Golub, Edward Kienholz, Martha Rosler, Peter Saul, Nancy Spero, and Robert Morris; artists’ groups including the Art Workers’ Coalition (AWC) and the Artists Protest Committee (APC); and iconic works of collective protest art such as AWC’s Q. And Babies? A. And Babies and APC’s The Artists Tower of Protest. Israel also formulates a typology of antiwar engagement, identifying and naming artists’ approaches to protest. These approaches range from extra-aesthetic actions—advertisements, strikes, walk-outs, and petitions without a visual aspect—to advance memorials, which were war memorials purposefully created before the war’s end that criticized both the war and the form and content of traditional war memorials.

Matthew Israel is an art historian and is currently Director of The Art Genome Project at Art.sy.
Title:Kill for Peace: American Artists Against the Vietnam WarFormat:PaperbackDimensions:278 pages, 9 × 6.02 × 0.68 inPublished:July 15, 2013Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292748302

ISBN - 13:9780292748309

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Kill for Peace: American Artists Against the Vietnam War

Reviews

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Chapter One: The Beginnings of the Vietnam War and the Antiwar Movement
  • Chapter Two: The Beginnings of Artistic Antiwar Engagement: Artists and Writers Protest and the Artists’ Protest Committee
  • Chapter Three: Creating Antiwar Art
  • Chapter Four: Angry Arts
  • Chapter Five: 1968
  • Chapter Six: 1969: AWC, Dead Babies, Dead American Soldiers
  • Chapter Seven: The Invasion of Cambodia, the New York Art Strike, and Conceptual Art as Antiwar
  • Chapter Eight: Toward an End
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Selected Bibliography
  • Index

Editorial Reviews

The Vietnam War (1964–1975) divided American society like no other war of the twentieth century, and some of the most memorable American art and art-related activism of the last fifty years protested U.S. involvement. At a time when Pop Art, Minimalism, and Conceptual Art dominated the American art world, individual artists and art collectives played a significant role in antiwar protest and inspired subsequent generations of artists. This significant story of engagement, which has never been covered in a book-length survey before, is the subject of Kill for Peace.Writing for both general and academic audiences, Matthew Israel recounts the major moments in the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement and describes artists’ individual and collective responses to them. He discusses major artists such as Leon Golub, Edward Kienholz, Martha Rosler, Peter Saul, Nancy Spero, and Robert Morris; artists’ groups including the Art Workers’ Coalition (AWC) and the Artists Protest Committee (APC); and iconic works of collective protest art such as AWC’s Q. And Babies? A. And Babies and APC’s The Artists Tower of Protest. Israel also formulates a typology of antiwar engagement, identifying and naming artists’ approaches to protest. These approaches range from extra-aesthetic actions—advertisements, strikes, walk-outs, and petitions without a visual aspect—to advance memorials, which were war memorials purposefully created before the war’s end that criticized both the war and the form and content of traditional war memorials."Israel’s significant contribution lies in his extensive research and the way he contextualizes the art as it parallels the history of the Vietnam War. This is a smart way of analyzing the timeliness and effectiveness of antiwar art and has not been done at this length and depth. . . . There is no other book that covers this territory anywhere as thoroughly. It will be very useful for teaching." - Lucy R. Lippard, writer, activist, and author of A Different War