King of Keji by Jan CoatesKing of Keji by Jan Coates

King of Keji

byJan CoatesIllustratorPatsy MacKinnon

Paperback | May 21, 2015

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Jacob’s brother, Ben, is always king of the castle. Jacob is tired of being the dirty rascal!

Jacob and his grandfather decide to set out on a camping trip to Nova Scotia’s Kejimkujik National Park. There, they find lots of hidden treasure fit for a king, like emeralds (the green of a hemlock’s foliage), amber (the eyes of a deer), and diamonds (in the sky).

Jacob even builds himself a crown, and it isn’t long before Gramps declares Jacob the King of Keji!

Jan L. Coates is the author of several books for young readers, including A Hare in the Elephant's Trunk, which was a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award. She lives in Nova Scotia's beautiful Annapolis Valley, with her husband, Don, and a Golden Irish named Charlie. When her kids, Liam and Shannon, were little, they love...
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Title:King of KejiFormat:PaperbackDimensions:32 pages, 8 × 10 × 0.13 inPublished:May 21, 2015Publisher:Nimbus PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:177108281X

ISBN - 13:9781771082815

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from lovely story of discovering treasures hidden in plain sight In The King of Keji we meet Jacob, a young boy who is tired of being second to his older brother. His brother is always king of the castle which makes Jacob the dirty rascal – a nursery rhyme game – so his grandfather teaches Jacob about being a king in nature. Gramps takes Jacob to Kejimkujik National Part (in Nova Scotia, Canada) for a weekend of camping, hiking, and searching for hidden treasure. Hidden treasure is different from buried treasure, so Jacob learns to look for the things hidden in plain sight, things he would otherwise easily overlook. They discuss what treasures a king would have and thought of a sceptre, antiques, turquoise, diamonds, jade, emeralds, and several more. Jacob finds a long piece of driftwood that works well as a sceptre and they set out. While hiking, Gramps takes pictures of the things they find. Some of the treasures were the emerald-green leaves of an ancient hemlock tree, the diamond sparkle of the lake, the jade colour of frogs sitting on moss-covered rocks, and the gold and ruby colours of the sunset that night. Jacob feels like a king with all that treasure – even though they took nothing away with them except pictures – and learns how to be more observant and respectful of his surroundings. The King of Keji is a story very well told, full of description and the allurement of a nature hike in one of Nova Scotia’s beautiful provincial parks. The illustrations by Patsy MacKinnon are full of nature’s colours. The reader gets to appreciate the variety found in Keji park from the huge trees along the hiking trails, to the animals that live there and in the salt marsh, to the glorious sky as the sun is setting. The King of Keji by Jan L. Coates encourages readers to be more aware of what’s around them in nature, and to appreciate the treasures already provided for us.
Date published: 2017-05-01