Kissing Carrion by Gemma Files

Kissing Carrion

byGemma FilesIntroduction byCaitlìn R. Kiernan

Kobo ebook | August 20, 2019

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Seventeen short stories of horror and dark fantasy—including an International Horror Guild Award winner—by the author of the Hexslinger Trilogy.

In this short story collection from Gemma Files—featuring “The Emperor’s Old Bones”, winner of the 1999 International Horror Guild Award for Best Short Fiction, and five never-before-published stories—we tour the overlooked intersections between wilderness and civilization where secret dances of fear and pain are performed and hunters and hunted change roles.

“At her best, in pieces like ‘Skeleton Bitch,’ ‘Keepsake,’ ‘Skin City’ and ‘Mouthful of Pins,’ Gemma Files transcends mere storytelling and her prose approaches the poetic, a prose poetry of terror and awe, ruin and pain and horror and constant sorrow. Here are words placed just so, precisely employed in an artistic economy that few writers ever bother to learn.” —Caitlin R. Kiernan, from the introduction

Title:Kissing CarrionFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:August 20, 2019Publisher:ChiZine PublicationsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990057815089

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From the Author

Seventeen short stories of horror and dark fantasy—including an International Horror Guild Award winner—by the author of the Hexslinger Trilogy.In this short story collection from Gemma Files—featuring “The Emperor’s Old Bones”, winner of the 1999 International Horror Guild Award for Best Short Fiction, and five never-before-published stories—we tour the overlooked intersections between wilderness and civilization where secret dances of fear and pain are performed and hunters and hunted change roles.“At her best, in pieces like ‘Skeleton Bitch,’ ‘Keepsake,’ ‘Skin City’ and ‘Mouthful of Pins,’ Gemma Files transcends mere storytelling and her prose approaches the poetic, a prose poetry of terror and awe, ruin and pain and horror and constant sorrow. Here are words placed just so, precisely employed in an artistic economy that few writers ever bother to learn.” —Caitlin R. Kiernan, from the introduction