Kissing the Mask: Beauty, Understatement And Femininity In Japanese Noh Theater, With Some Thoughts On Muses (especia by William T. VollmannKissing the Mask: Beauty, Understatement And Femininity In Japanese Noh Theater, With Some Thoughts On Muses (especia by William T. Vollmann

Kissing the Mask: Beauty, Understatement And Femininity In Japanese Noh Theater, With Some Thoughts…

byWilliam T. Vollmann

Hardcover | April 6, 2010

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“Intrepid journalist and novelist William T. Vollman’s colossal body of work stands unsurpassed for its range, moral imperative, and artistry.”
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William T. Vollmann, the National Book Award–winning author of Europe Central, offers a charming, evocative, and piercing examination of the ancient Japanese tradition of Noh theatre and the keys it holds to our modern understanding of beauty.  Kissing the Mask is the first major book on Noh by an American writer since the 1916 publication the classic study Pisan Cantos and the Noh by Ezra Pound. But Kissing the Mask is pure Vollman—illustrated with photos by the author with provocative related side-discussions on femininity, transgender, kabuki, pornography, geishas, and more.<_o3a_p>

From the National Book Award-winning author of Europe Central comes a charming, evocative and piercing examination of an ancient Japanese tradition and the keys it holds to our modern understanding of beauty....What is a woman? To what extent is femininity a performance? Writing with the extraordin-ary awareness and endless curiosity t...
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Title:Kissing the Mask: Beauty, Understatement And Femininity In Japanese Noh Theater, With Some Thoughts…Format:HardcoverDimensions:528 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.23 inPublished:April 6, 2010Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0061228486

ISBN - 13:9780061228483

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“Reward[s] the reader who stays with it for the long trip, the way a travel chronicle does.... Vollmann is not just a writer who admires. He is a writer who looks and touches.”