Kizumonogatari: Wound Tale by Nishio NisioisinKizumonogatari: Wound Tale by Nishio Nisioisin

Kizumonogatari: Wound Tale

byNishio NisioisinIllustratorVofan

Paperback | December 15, 2015

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about

Around midnight, under a lonely street lamp in a provincial town in Japan, lies a white woman, a blonde, alone, robbed of all four limbs, yet undead. Indeed, a rumor's been circulating among the local girls that a vampire has come to their backwater, of all places.
     Koyomi Araragi, who prefers to avoid having friends because they'd lower his “intensity as a human," is naturally skeptical. Yet it is to him that the bloodsucking demon, a concept “dated twice over," beckons on the first day of spring break as he makes his way home with a fresh loot of morally compromising periodicals.
     Always disarmingly candid, often hilariously playful, and sometimes devastatingly moving, KIZUMONOGATARI: Wound Tale is the perfect gateway into the world of author NISIOISIN, the bestselling young novelist in Japan today. The prequel to BAKEMONOGATARI (“Monster Tale"), this is where the legendary MONOGATARI series, whose anime adaptations have enjoyed international popularity and critical acclaim, begins. A theatrical feature based on KIZUMONOGATARI is due to be released in Japan in January 2016.
There are few authors in Japan who have reached the heights of success as NISIOISIN. Born in 1981, NISIOISIN left of Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, to pursue a career in story-telling. Initially he had ambitions to be a comic artist, but when he realized his art was not up to snuff, he began to focus on his writing. He would even...
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Title:Kizumonogatari: Wound TaleFormat:PaperbackDimensions:354 pages, 7.48 × 5.51 × 0.91 inPublished:December 15, 2015Publisher:Kodansha USALanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1941220975

ISBN - 13:9781941220979

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from I really enjoyed this book. I bought this book after randomly checking out the first movie in the three-part anime adaptation of this book, I liked the movie and enjoyed the book even more. I don't read many novels but this one did a good job sucking me in with really sharp and descriptive writing, and it wasn't too long either which was nice. I'll be checking out the Bakemonogatari books after reading this! :)
Date published: 2017-07-25
Rated 2 out of 5 by from An Easier ride than the Film Trilogy. After seeing 2 and a half TV seasons, I decided to try the book to get an easier (and original) version on the Kizumonogatari tale. At the time, the 3 films adapting it weren't finished (They've completed now) and I hoped it would remind me why I liked the series originally. It did, but it also reminded me of why I dropped the series in the first place. The short version: read it as the first chronological story in the series, but expect several barriers to entry. The Good: Superb dialogue, smart characters, and unique characterization. Plus the humor tends to sneak up on you and the fights are some of the most intelligent I've seen in awhile. That is good. The Bad: Those barriers to entry. A few persistent scenes of sexual humor, blood, gore, violence, or grim details without it becoming hopeless or malicious. Just...annoying. And even if it makes sense for the characters, as a reader, I did not enjoy reading those bits. Summary: Be careful of your expectations, but if you ever try the films and realize they are too difficult to watch, take the novel route. Easier to handle in written format, instead of bloody visuals and lots of quality audio. Now some quick notes on the anime. Feel free to read the stories in novel format if its easier. Not that they all end in Monogatari (Japanese for Story or Tale) I thought the First season (Bakemonogatari); for the most part; was fascinating, yet shocking and boldly visual series. Filled with a great deal of striking visuals, snarky dialogue, and a great deal of talking; which is some of the most interesting dialogue I've seen in the genre. Even if there were several pop-culture references I did not get in the slightest. The prequel OVA (Nekomonogari Black) was equally brilliant, and scary a good way. By that I mean, intimidating with presence while redirecting where you think the narrative goes. In other words, I enjoyed it. Plus it came after Kizumonogatari (but before Bakemonogatari- First Season), so I have greater context after reading this novels. Then the problems started happening. I hated the next part of First Season (Nisemonogatari) and it really made me question the author's focus on some characters which I really don't think should have had depth to. Hated Karen and Tsukihi. Then Monogatari Second Season. Went back to the good bits of the series and started with a followup to the 2 previous Nekomonogatari arcs, which had the most interesting character in the whole series. It was excellent from there. However, after the halfway point, I pushed through an arc that I hated and decided to put it on hold. I have yet to jump back in. (In future avoid any arc with the Snake Girl). That's everything, but they are adapting 2nd half of Final Season (Third). They'll keep making more, but if you want keep up with the novels or anime as they come out. You should not rush this series. I would lose track of people. Thanks for reading. Hope you got something out of it. And even if you don't like the book or series, at least you know what to look for or avoid in future anime/manga/or Japanese translated novels.
Date published: 2017-06-17
Rated 2 out of 5 by from An Easier Read than the Alternative Films After seeing 2 and a half TV seasons, I decided to try the book to get an easier (and original) version on the Kizumonogatari tale. At the time, the 3 films adapting it weren't finished (They've completed now) and I hoped it would remind me why I liked the series originally. It did, but it also reminded me of why I dropped the series in the first place. The short version: read it as the first chronological story in the series, but expect several barriers to entry. The Good: Superb dialogue, smart characters, and unique characterization. Plus the humor tends to sneak up on you and the fights are some of the most intelligent I've seen in awhile. That is good. The Bad: Those barriers to entry. A few persistent scenes of sexual humor, blood, gore, violence, or grim details without it becoming hopeless or malicious. Just...annoying. And even if it makes sense for the characters, as a reader, I did not enjoy reading those bits. Summary: Be careful of your expectations, but if you ever try the films and realize they are too difficult to watch, take the novel route. Easier to handle in written format, instead of bloody visuals and lots of quality audio. Now some quick notes on the anime. Feel free to read the stories in novel format if its easier. Not that they all end in Monogatari (Japanese for Story or Tale) I thought the First season (Bakemonogatari); for the most part; was fascinating, yet shocking and boldly visual series. Filled with a great deal of striking visuals, snarky dialogue, and a great deal of talking; which is some of the most interesting dialogue I've seen in the genre. Even if there were several pop-culture references I did not get in the slightest. The prequel OVA (Nekomonogari Black) was equally brilliant, and scary a good way. By that I mean, intimidating with presence while redirecting where you think the narrative goes. In other words, I enjoyed it. Plus it came after Kizumonogatari (but before Bakemonogatari- First Season), so I have greater context after reading this novels. Then the problems started happening. I hated the next part of First Season (Nisemonogatari) and it really made me question the author's focus on some characters which I really don't think should have had depth to. Hated Karen and Tsukihi. Then Monogatari Second Season. Went back to the good bits of the series and started with a followup to the 2 previous Nekomonogatari arcs, which had the most interesting character in the whole series. It was excellent from there. However, after the halfway point, I pushed through an arc that I hated and decided to put it on hold. I have yet to jump back in. (In future avoid any arc with the Snake Girl). That's everything, but they are adapting 2nd half of Final Season (Third). They'll keep making more, but if you want keep up with the novels or anime as they come out. You should not rush this series. I would lose track of people. Thanks for reading. Hope you got something out of it. And even if you don't like the book or series, at least you know what to look for or avoid in future anime/manga/or Japanese translated novels.
Date published: 2017-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Any Fan will Love This As a big fan of the animated series since 2012 and reading this novel in 2013 I can confidently say that any fan will enjoy this book. Before or after the anime movie adaption as well. ... If you have never read a volume of The Monogatari Series, this one is a great first read as any. I'm not the best reviewer who can elaborately explain details clearly so I won't force myself. But I can say that I'm sure a lot of the fans will love Kizumonogatari.
Date published: 2016-08-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A tale of wounds and deep bonds. Kizumonogatari (Wound Tale) a book that sets the stage for Bakemonogatari (Monster Tale) a book series that has stayed mostly in Japan, is the second part in the famous/infamous Monogatari Series. The series is known for it's over sexualized narrations, and often quirky, violent writing. The story we see (most of the series anyway), through the eyes of a 17 year old boy Araragi Koyomi. Something that is prominent with the monogatari series is that it tells the events out of order, and often you would find jumping back and forth to understand what exactly is happening, however Kizumonogatari being the beginning of this ordeal does not suffer from this problem, so it is a good place to start for new comers. Monogatari however has it's own distinct style which understandably is hard to get into. The story is delivered in small bite sized sentences and are mostly Araragi's thoughts on what is happening in the world around him. However the writing in this version could have been improved, though understandably Monogatari is a hard series to translate, solely because of the way it is written, and this book is way better then any online translation you would find, and is much welcome. All i am saying is that this won't win any writing or translation awards. All in all, it is a good read and worth a buy if you know and love the series. Keep in mind while buying this that this is seen through the eyes of a 17 year old boy, and on a general 17 year old boys over sexualize everything. And Araragi (16-17) is no different. So be prepared for that if you get offended easily. Cons; >Weird Quirky style of writing >Not for everybody Pros; >Best translation out in the wild right now >Amazing story >Is a quick and fun read
Date published: 2015-12-18

Editorial Reviews

“A great prose voice, strong central narrative, and endless thematic echoes make this a rich experience for Monogatari fans and likely a fun one even for newcomers.” – Anime News Network“Kizumonogatari keeps your eyes glued to the page by intertwining the normal with the paranormal. . . .  For the most part, the English translation of Kizumonogatari does a great job in capturing the tone and style of the original. The characters are still fun, quirky, and just as animated as they were in show supported by strong dialogue.” – Japanator.com