Knightons Chronicle 1337-1396

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byHenry Knighton, G. H. Martin

not yet rated|write a review
Henry Knighton, a canon of St Mary's Abbey, Leicester, wrote his Chronicle between 1378 and 1396. Leicester was a fief of the duchy of Lancaster, and the abbey was closely in touch with the households of Henry of Grosmont and John of Gaunt. The Chronicle contains exceptionally vivid accountsof the campaigns in France, in which Duke Henry was one of Edward III's leading generals, of the onset and effects of the Black Death, and of the crises of Richard II's reign. Knighton, whose fellow canon Philip Repingdon was a pupil and early disciple of John Wyclif, was a horrified witness of therise of Lollardy, his account of which is unmatched.The Chronicle was printed in 1652 in a competent text with a brief Latin commentary, and less satisfactorily in the Rolls Series in 1889-95. This edition includes analysis of the text and its sources, and the first translation of its distinguished and engaging narrative.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$426.54 online
$607.50 list price (save 29%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Henry Knighton, a canon of St Mary's Abbey, Leicester, wrote his Chronicle between 1378 and 1396. Leicester was a fief of the duchy of Lancaster, and the abbey was closely in touch with the households of Henry of Grosmont and John of Gaunt. The Chronicle contains exceptionally vivid accountsof the campaigns in France, in which Duke H...

G.H. Martin is a Professor of History at University of Essex.

other books by Henry Knighton

Format:HardcoverDimensions:680 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.73 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198205031

ISBN - 13:9780198205036

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Knightons Chronicle 1337-1396

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

`assured of a warm welcome ... The translation is readable, even racy ... there is some impressive verse translating ... The detailed account of the first Lollards is especially welcome in translation. Professor Martin has performed the most difficult parts of his task with verve anddistinction.'A.K. McHardy, University of Nottingham, EHR Nov. 97